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Protein Cell. 2020 Jan 6. doi: 10.1007/s13238-019-00683-9. [Epub ahead of print]

Lifting the veil on the keratinocyte contribution to cutaneous nociception.

Author information

1
Univ Brest, LIEN, 29200, Brest, France. matthieu.talagas@chu-brest.fr.
2
Laboratoire d'Organogenèse Expérimentale (LOEX), University of Laval, Quebec, Canada. matthieu.talagas@chu-brest.fr.
3
Department of Dermatology, Brest University Hospital, Brest, France. matthieu.talagas@chu-brest.fr.
4
Univ Brest, IBSAM (Institut Brestois de Santé Agro matière), 29200, Brest, France. matthieu.talagas@chu-brest.fr.
5
Univ Brest, LIEN, 29200, Brest, France.
6
Univ Brest, IBSAM (Institut Brestois de Santé Agro matière), 29200, Brest, France.
7
Laboratoire d'Organogenèse Expérimentale (LOEX), University of Laval, Quebec, Canada.
8
Department of Dermatology, Brest University Hospital, Brest, France.

Abstract

Cutaneous nociception is essential to prevent individuals from sustaining injuries. According to the conventional point of view, the responses to noxious stimuli are thought to be exclusively initiated by sensory neurons, whose activity would be at most modulated by keratinocytes. However recent studies have demonstrated that epidermal keratinocytes can also act as primary nociceptive transducers as a supplement to sensory neurons. To enlighten our understanding of cutaneous nociception, this review highlights recent and relevant findings on the cellular and molecular elements that underlie the contribution of epidermal keratinocytes as nociceptive modulators and noxious sensors, both under healthy and pathological conditions.

KEYWORDS:

TRP; inflammation; keratinocyte; nociception; pain; skin

PMID:
31907794
DOI:
10.1007/s13238-019-00683-9

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