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J Cancer Surviv. 2020 Jan 6. doi: 10.1007/s11764-019-00849-8. [Epub ahead of print]

The Women's Circle of Health Follow-Up Study: a population-based longitudinal study of Black breast cancer survivors in New Jersey.

Author information

1
Cancer Prevention and Control Program, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, 195 Little Albany St, New Brunswick, NJ, 08903, USA. elisa.bandera@rutgers.edu.
2
Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Rutgers School of Public Health, Piscataway, NJ, USA. elisa.bandera@rutgers.edu.
3
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, SUNY Downstate Health Sciences University, Brooklyn, NY, USA.
4
Cancer Prevention and Control Program, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, 195 Little Albany St, New Brunswick, NJ, 08903, USA.
5
Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Rutgers School of Public Health, Piscataway, NJ, USA.
6
Cancer Epidemiology Services, New Jersey State Cancer Registry, Trenton, NJ, USA.
7
Department of Health Behavior, Society & Policy, Rutgers School of Public Health, Piscataway, NJ, USA.
8
Department of Cancer Prevention and Control, Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center, Buffalo, NY, USA.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

The Women's Circle of Health Follow-Up Study is an ongoing longitudinal study of African American/Black breast cancer survivors in New Jersey, specifically designed to evaluate the impact of obesity and related comorbidities on breast cancer survival and health-related quality-of-life in this understudied population. Here, we describe our recruitment and data collection methods and compare characteristics of the overall cohort and the subcohort with follow-up data.

METHODS:

Newly diagnosed breast cancer cases have been recruited into the study since 2006. Pre-diagnosis data on relevant factors and a saliva sample are collected during an in-person interview within 12 months from diagnosis. In 2013, we began active follow up by recontacting participants annually, including two home visits at approximately 2 and 3 years post-diagnosis, during which blood samples are collected. Mortality outcomes (all-cause and breast cancer-specific mortality) are ascertained through linkage with New Jersey State Cancer Registry files. We expect to assemble a cohort of over 2000 Black breast cancer survivors with at least 800 of them having detailed post-diagnosis data.

RESULTS:

Distribution of sociodemographic characteristics, body mass index, comorbidities, clinicopathologic characteristics, and treatment modalities were very similar between those in the full cohort and the subset with follow-up data and blood samples. Obesity (> 50%), hypertension (> 58%), and diabetes (22%) were common in this population.

CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS FOR CANCER SURVIVORS:

This ongoing longitudinal study represents a unique resource to better understand breast cancer outcomes, patient-reported symptoms, and health-related quality of life among Black breast cancer survivors.

KEYWORDS:

Black women; Breast cancer; Cancer survivors; Comorbidities; Obesity; Quality of life

PMID:
31907766
DOI:
10.1007/s11764-019-00849-8

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