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Nutrients. 2020 Jan 2;12(1). pii: E131. doi: 10.3390/nu12010131.

The Mediterranean Diet is Associated with an Improved Quality of Life in Adults with Type 1 Diabetes.

Author information

1
Department of Endocrinology and Nutrition, Health Sciences Research Institute & University Hospital Germans Trias i Pujol, 08916 Badalona, Spain.
2
Biomedical Research Institute of Lleida (IRBLleida) & University of Lleida, 25198 Lleida, Spain.
3
Systems Biology and Statistical Methods for Biomedical Research, Biomedical Research Institute of Lleida (IRBLleida), University of Lleida, 25198 Lleida, Spain.
4
Department of Endocrinology and Nutrition, Biomedical Research Institute of Lleida (IRBLleida) & University Hospital Arnau de Vilanova, 25198 Lleida, Spain.
5
Centre for Biomedical Research on Diabetes and Associated Metabolic Diseases (CIBERDEM), Instituto de Salud Carlos III, 08041 Barcelona, Spain.
6
Department of Endocrinology and Nutrition, University Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau & Institut d'Investigació Biomèdica Sant Pau (IIB Sant Pau), Autonomous University of Barcelona, 08041 Barcelona, Spain.

Abstract

This study aimed to assess the potential association between dietary patterns (i.e., the Mediterranean Diet (MedDiet) and healthy eating) and patient-reported quality of life (QoL) and treatment satisfaction (TS) in adults with type 1 diabetes (T1D). A food frequency questionnaire, the Audit of Diabetes-Dependent Quality of Life (ADDQoL-19), and the Diabetes Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire-status version (DTSQ-s) were administered via personal interviews to 258 participants with T1D. Multivariable analysis showed that a moderate or high adherence to the MedDiet was associated with greater diabetes-specific QoL (β = 0.32, 95% CI = 0.03; 0.61; p = 0.029). None of the dietary quality indexes (i.e., the alternate Mediterranean Diet Score (aMED) and the alternate Healthy Eating Index (aHEI)) were associated with the overall TS. However, the aHEI was positively associated with the specific items of TS "convenience" and "flexibility" (β = 0.03, 95% CI = 0.00; 0.06; p = 0.042 and β = 0.04; 95% CI = 0.01; 0.06; p = 0.011, respectively). On the other hand, the aHEI was negatively associated with the dimension "recommend to others" (β = -0.5, 95% CI = -0.99; -0.02; p = 0.042). In conclusion, a moderate and high adherence to the MedDiet was associated with greater QoL. Although neither aMED nor aHEI were associated with the overall TS, some specific items were positively (i.e., "convenience", "flexibility") or negatively ("recommend to others") related to the aHEI. Further research is needed to assess how to improve medical nutrition therapy and its impact on patient-reported outcomes in people with T1D.

KEYWORDS:

Mediterranean Diet; dietary pattern; nutrient intake; patient-reported outcomes; quality of life; treatment satisfaction; type 1 diabetes

PMID:
31906543
DOI:
10.3390/nu12010131
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