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Free Radic Biol Med. 2020 Jan 3;148:83-95. doi: 10.1016/j.freeradbiomed.2019.12.039. [Epub ahead of print]

Mitochondrial Lon protease - depleted HeLa cells exhibit proteome modifications related to protein quality control, stress response and energy metabolism.

Author information

1
Sorbonne Université, CNRS, INSERM, Institut de Biologie Paris-Seine, Biological Adaptation and Aging, B2A-IBPS, F-75005, Paris, France.
2
Sorbonne Université, CNRS, INSERM, Institut de Biologie Paris-Seine, Biological Adaptation and Aging, B2A-IBPS, F-75005, Paris, France. Electronic address: bertrand.friguet@sorbonne-universite.fr.

Abstract

The ATP-dependent Lon protease is located in the mitochondrial matrix and oxidized proteins are among its primary targets for their degradation. Impairment of mitochondrial morphology and function together with apoptosis were observed in lung fibroblasts depleted for Lon expression while accumulation of carbonylated mitochondrial proteins has been reported for yeast and HeLa Lon deficient cells. In addition, age-related mitochondrial dysfunction has been associated with an impairment of Lon expression. Using a HeLa cell line stably transfected with an inducible shRNA directed against Lon, we have previously observed that Lon depletion results in a mild phenotype characterized by an increase of both production of reactive oxygen species and level of oxidized proteins (Bayot et al., 2014, Biochimie, 100: 38-47). In this study using the same cell line, we now show that Lon knockdown leads to modifications of the expression of a number of specific proteins involved in protein quality control, stress response and energy metabolism, as evidenced using a 2D gel-based proteomic approach, and to alteration of the mitochondrial network morphology. We also show that these effects are associated with decreased proliferation and can be modulated by culture conditions in galactose versus glucose containing medium.

KEYWORDS:

Energy metabolism; HeLa cells; Lon protease; Mitochondrial dysfunction; Oxidative stress; Proteomics

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