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Pediatr Neurol. 2020 Mar;104:46-53. doi: 10.1016/j.pediatrneurol.2019.10.007. Epub 2019 Nov 29.

Intranasal Ketamine for Abortive Migraine Therapy in Pediatric Patients: A Single-Center Review.

Author information

1
Department of Pharmacy, Cook Children's Medical Center, Fort Worth, Texas; Jane and John Justin Neurosciences Center, Cook Children's Medical Center, Fort Worth, Texas. Electronic address: adrianturner89@gmail.com.
2
Jane and John Justin Neurosciences Center, Cook Children's Medical Center, Fort Worth, Texas; Research Administration Office, Cook Children's Medical Center, Fort Worth, Texas.
3
Department of Pharmacy, Cook Children's Medical Center, Fort Worth, Texas.
4
Jane and John Justin Neurosciences Center, Cook Children's Medical Center, Fort Worth, Texas.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Ketamine has recently emerged as a promising therapeutic alternative for abortive migraine therapy, likely secondary to N-methyl-d-aspartate antagonism. Most reports examine adults and the intravenous route. Fewer utilize intranasal administration or pediatric populations. Given the limited evidence for intranasal ketamine in pediatric migraine populations, we retrospectively reviewed our experience to further characterize safety and efficacy of intranasal ketamine in this population.

METHODS:

A retrospective review in a free-standing, pediatric medical center was performed examining the utilization of intranasal ketamine at 0.1 to 0.2 mg/kg/dose up to five doses in pediatric migraineurs. Pain scores (scale = 0 to 10) were recorded at baseline and after each dose. Response was characterized as pain score reduction to 0 to -3 and/or reduction of at least 50%.

RESULTS:

Twenty-five encounters (25 of 34; 73.5%) were responders (mean pain score reduction of -7.2 from admission to treatment completion). Overall pain reduction from admission to discharge in the entire study population was 66.1%. Side effects were mild and transient.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our experience with intranasal ketamine has promising outcomes in both pain relief and side effect minimization. When other therapeutic options are unavailable, practitioners should consider intranasal ketamine.

KEYWORDS:

Adolescents; Children; Efficacy; Headache; Ketamine; Migraine; NMDA antagonist; Treatment

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