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J Racial Ethn Health Disparities. 2020 Jan 3. doi: 10.1007/s40615-019-00665-x. [Epub ahead of print]

Prevalence and Predictors of Co-occurring Hypertension and Depression Among Community-Dwelling Older Adults.

Gray CA1, Sims OT2,3,4,5,6, Oh H7.

Author information

1
Department of Community Health and Human Services, School of Education, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 901 13th Street South, Birmingham, AL, 35294-1250, USA. cgray@uab.edu.
2
Department of Social Work, College of Arts and Sciences, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USA.
3
Department of Health Behavior, School of Public Health, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USA.
4
Comprehensive Center for Healthy Aging, School of Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USA.
5
Center for AIDS Research, School of Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USA.
6
Center for AIDS Prevention Studies, Division of Prevention Science, Department of Medicine, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA.
7
Department of Social Work, School of Social Sciences & Education, California State University, Dorothy Donahoe Hall A109, Bakersfield, CA, 93311, USA.

Abstract

The objectives of this study were to estimate the prevalence of co-occurring hypertension and depression among community-dwelling older adults and to examine predictors of co-occurring hypertension among community-dwelling older adults. A secondary analysis was conducted from a statewide survey of community-dwelling older adults in the state of Alabama. Binomial logistic regression was used to examine predictors of co-occurring hypertension and depression. The prevalence of co-occurring hypertension and depression among community-dwelling older adults was 35%. In the multivariate analysis, non-Hispanic African American ethnicity (OR = 1.690, CI 1.221-2.341) and diabetes (OR = 1.668, CI 1.173-2.372) were positively associated with co-occurring hypertension and depression. Income ≥ $20,000 (OR = 0.544, CI 0.400-0.739), ≥ 3 meals on average per day (OR = 0.576, CI 0.429-0.774), and higher self-ratings of general health (OR = 0.728, CI 0.628-0.843) and physical activity (OR = 0.827, CI 0.694-0.986) were negatively associated with co-occurring hypertension and depression. Public health professionals and clinicians who provide care to older adults in public health, community health, and primary care settings are in ideal positions to develop intervention strategies to curb the prevalence and incidence of co-occurring hypertension and depression in this population. If intervention strategies are not implemented in these respective settings, unfortunately community-dwelling older adults of non-Hispanic African American ethnicity, with diabetes, or with low self-ratings of general health and physical activity will likely suffer from cardiovascular disease at much higher rates than their counterparts.

KEYWORDS:

Depression; Hypertension; Older adults; Predictors; Prevalence

PMID:
31900746
DOI:
10.1007/s40615-019-00665-x

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