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Food Chem. 2020 May 15;312:126040. doi: 10.1016/j.foodchem.2019.126040. Epub 2019 Dec 17.

Gut microbiota and short chain fatty acid composition as affected by legume type and processing methods as assessed by simulated in vitro digestion assays.

Author information

1
College of Biological and Agricultural Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun 130022, China; Experimental Seafood Processing Laboratory, Costal Research and Extension Center, Mississippi State University, MS 39567, United States; Department of Food Science, Nutrition and Health Promotion, Mississippi State University, MS 39762, United States.
2
Experimental Seafood Processing Laboratory, Costal Research and Extension Center, Mississippi State University, MS 39567, United States; Department of Food Science, Nutrition and Health Promotion, Mississippi State University, MS 39762, United States. Electronic address: sc1690@msstate.edu.
3
Experimental Seafood Processing Laboratory, Costal Research and Extension Center, Mississippi State University, MS 39567, United States.
4
Institute for Genomics, Biocomputing and Biotechnology, Mississippi State University, MS 39762, United States.
5
Department of Food Science, Nutrition and Health Promotion, Mississippi State University, MS 39762, United States.

Abstract

This study's objective was to investigate how legume type and processing method affected digestibility, and subsequent gut microbiota and short chain fatty acid (SCFA) formation. After autoclaving and germinating-cooking, pinto bean and soybean were subjected to in vitro digestion. The digestion residues were fractionated into soluble and insoluble fiber, and fermented by microbiota from pig feces. Results showed the in vitro digestibility was affected significantly by processing method and legume type. Autoclaving resulted in higher digestibility. The in-vitro digested bean residues caused a rapid pH decrease in the first 12 h during the fermentation with pig feces, and a significant increse in the formation of SCFAs. A positive modulation of the gut microbiota by the in-vitro digested bean residues was observed. Prevotella copri and Bacteroides vulgatus exhibited the highest relative abundance in the treatments with germinated bean's soluble residues. Phascolarctobacterium succinatutens was increased by the insoluble residues.

KEYWORDS:

Dietary fibers; Gut microbiota; Pinto beans; Processing method; Soybeans

PMID:
31896457
DOI:
10.1016/j.foodchem.2019.126040
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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