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J Diabetes Metab Disord. 2019 Jul 4;18(2):349-362. doi: 10.1007/s40200-019-00419-w. eCollection 2019 Dec.

Effect of selenium supplementation on glycemic indices: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

Author information

1
1Department of Basic and Clinical Research, Tehran Heart Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
2
2School of Public Health, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
3
3Development of Research & Technology Center, Deputy of Research and Technology, Ministry of Health and Medical Education, Tehran, Iran.
4
4Non-communicable Diseases Research Center, Endocrinology and Metabolism Population Sciences Institute, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
5
5Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Serdang, Selangor Malaysia.
6
6Obesity and Eating Habits Research Center, Endocrinology and Metabolism Molecular -Cellular Sciences Institute, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
7
7Non-communicable Diseases Research Center, Alborz University of Medical Sciences, Karaj, Iran.
8
8Department of Medical Emergencies, Qom University of Medical Sciences, Qom, Iran.
9
9Endocrinology and Metabolism Research Center, Endocrinology and Metabolism Clinical Sciences Institute, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
10
10Social Determinants of Health Research Center, University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences, Tehran, Iran.

Abstract

Purpose:

The association between selenium supplementation and glycemic indices seems to be a controversial issue. This systematic review and meta-analysis was conducted to evaluate the effect of selenium supplementation on glycemic indices.

Methods:

We systematically searched PubMed/MEDLINE, ISI/WOS, and Scopus (from their commencements up to Jan 2016) for relevant studies examining the association between intake of selenium and glycemic indices. The data were extracted from relevant qualified studies and estimated using the random-effect or pooled model and standardized mean difference (SMD) with 95% confidence interval (CI).

Results:

Twelve articles published between 2004 and 2016 were included. In all the studies, the participants were randomly assigned to an intervention group (n = 757) or a control group(n = 684). All the studies were double blind, placebo controlled trials. Selenium supplementation resulted in a significant decrease in homeostasis model of assessment-estimated β-cell function (HOMA-B) (SMD: -0.63; 95%CI: -0.89 to -0.38) and a significant increase in quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICKI) (SMD: by 0.74; 95%CI: 0.49 to 0.1) as compared with the controls. There were no statistically significant improvements in glycemic indices, such as fasting plasma glucose (FPG), insulin, homeostasis model of assessment-estimated insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) and adiponectin.

Conclusion:

This meta-analysis indicated that selenium supplementation significantly decreased HOMA-B and increased QUICKI score. There was no statistically significant improvement in FPG, insulin, HOMA-IR, HbA1c and adiponectin indices following selenium supplementation.

KEYWORDS:

FPG; Glycemic indices; HbA1c; Insulin; Selenium

PMID:
31890660
PMCID:
PMC6914762
[Available on 2020-07-04]
DOI:
10.1007/s40200-019-00419-w
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