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Conscious Cogn. 2020 Feb;78:102863. doi: 10.1016/j.concog.2019.102863. Epub 2019 Dec 27.

Neuronal correlates of full and partial visual conscious perception.

Author information

1
Neuroscience Center, Helsinki Institute of Life Science, University of Helsinki, Finland; BioMag Laboratory, HUS Medical Imaging Center, Finland. Electronic address: hamed.haque@helsinki.fi.
2
Neuroscience Center, Helsinki Institute of Life Science, University of Helsinki, Finland.
3
Neuroscience Center, Helsinki Institute of Life Science, University of Helsinki, Finland; Centre for Cognitive Neuroimaging, Institute of Neuroscience and Psychology, University of Glasgow, United Kingdom; Department of Neuroscience and Biomedical Engineering, Aalto University, Finland.
4
Neuroscience Center, Helsinki Institute of Life Science, University of Helsinki, Finland; Centre for Cognitive Neuroimaging, Institute of Neuroscience and Psychology, University of Glasgow, United Kingdom. Electronic address: satu.palva@helsinki.fi.

Abstract

Stimuli may induce only partial consciousness-an intermediate between null and full consciousness-where the presence but not identity of an object can be reported. The differences in the neuronal basis of full and partial consciousness are poorly understood. We investigated if evoked and oscillatory activity could dissociate full from partial conscious perception. We recorded human cortical activity with magnetoencephalography (MEG) during a visual perception task in which stimulus could be either partially or fully perceived. Partial consciousness was associated with an early increase in evoked activity and theta/low-alpha-band oscillations while full consciousness was also associated with late evoked activity and beta-band oscillations. Full from partial consciousness was dissociated by stronger evoked activity and late increase in theta oscillations that were localized to higher-order visual regions and posterior parietal and prefrontal cortices. Our results reveal both evoked activity and theta oscillations dissociate partial and full consciousness.

KEYWORDS:

Conscious perception; Evoked response; MEG; Oscillations; Visual

PMID:
31887533
DOI:
10.1016/j.concog.2019.102863
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Conflict of interest statement

Declaration of Competing Interest The authors declare that they have no known competing financial interests or personal relationships that could have appeared to influence the work reported in this paper.

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