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Pediatr Diabetes. 2019 Dec 29. doi: 10.1111/pedi.12975. [Epub ahead of print]

School-aged children with type 1 diabetes benefit more from a coping skills training program than adolescents in China: 12-month outcomes of a randomized clinical trial.

Author information

1
Xiangya School of Nursing, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan, China.
2
Shenzhen University, Shenzhen, Guangdong, China.
3
School of Medicine, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California, USA.
4
Second Xiangya Hospital, Changsha, Hunan, China.
5
School of Nursing, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Managing type 1 diabetes can be challenging, especially for youth, so there is a need for effective interventions to help youth live with diabetes.

OBJECTIVE:

To determine the efficacy of a coping skills training program for Chinese youth with type 1 diabetes and to explore whether the efficacy of the program was different for school-aged children than for adolescents with type 1 diabetes.

METHODS:

A total of 100 youth with type 1 diabetes aged 8 to 20 years were randomly placed in either an intervention group (coping skills training + standard care) or a control group (standard care). Data were collected at baseline, 6-month, and 12-month follow-ups on primary outcomes of perceived stress, coping, and self-efficacy and secondary outcomes of diabetes self-management, quality of life, and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c). A generalized estimating equation analysis for repeated measures was used to determine the program effects and differential effects by age group.

RESULTS:

The coping skills training program had no significant effect on primary or secondary outcomes over 12 months. However, there was a significant increase in positive coping (P < .001), self-efficacy (P = .017), diabetes problem-solving and goals of diabetes self-management (P = .007, P = .001), and quality of life (P = .016) of school-aged children in the intervention group compared with the control group. There were no significant differences in primary or secondary outcomes between the intervention group and the control group (P > .05).

CONCLUSIONS:

The coping skills training program was effective for school-aged children, improving psychosocial and diabetes self-management outcomes. Further research is needed to develop programs that improve outcomes in adolescents with type 1 diabetes. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

KEYWORDS:

adolescents; children; coping skills training; type 1 diabetes

PMID:
31885120
DOI:
10.1111/pedi.12975

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