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Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2019 Dec 21. pii: S0003-9993(19)31442-X. doi: 10.1016/j.apmr.2019.11.007. [Epub ahead of print]

Gender-Based Salary Inequities among Pediatric Rehabilitation Medicine Physicians in the United States.

Author information

1
Department of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, University of Pittsburgh. Electronic address: houtrow@upmc.edu.
2
Department of Pediatrics, University of Cincinnati.
3
Department of Population Health Sciences & Center for Health Measurement, Duke University School of Medicine.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To assess if gender inequities exist for pediatric physiatrists and, if affirmative, what factors account for this difference.

DESIGN:

Cohort study SETTING: Online REDCap survey administered via email.

PARTICIPANTS:

Pediatric physiatrists practicing in the United States in 2017.

INTERVENTIONS:

Not applicable.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Respondents reported on their gender, training, practice type and location, leadership positions, years in practice and years at their current location, salary, research and clinical productivity.

RESULTS:

Of the 307 Surveys sent, 235 individuals responded, yielding a response rate of 76.5%. Pediatric physiatrists who identified as women were more likely to work part-time but were demographically similar to their colleagues who identified as men. The odds of having no leadership role were higher for women (OR=2.17, p=0.02) than men. Pediatric physiatrists who identified as men made on average $244,798 annually (STD =$52,906) compared to those who identified as women $224,497 (STD =$60,756). The average annual difference in full-time salary was $20,311 in favor of those who identified as men (95% CI: $3,135-$37,486). The set of predictors in the multivariable model explained about 40% of the total variability in annual full-time salary (R2 =0.389, Adjusted R2 =0.339; F(15,197) =7.734, p < .001). Gender was not a significant predictor in the model, but model prediction of the salaries of pediatric physiatrists who identified as men was better than model prediction of the salaries of those who identified as women.

CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE:

Despite representing a majority of the field, pediatric physiatrists who identified as women were paid less than their counterparts who identified as men. The traditional predictors associated with the salaries of men were not enough to explain salary variation among those who identified as women; providing evidence of the importance of intangible and unmeasured aspects of a women's career, such as bias and institutional culture.

KEYWORDS:

gender; inequity; pediatric rehabilitation; salary

PMID:
31874156
DOI:
10.1016/j.apmr.2019.11.007

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