Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Diabet Med. 2019 Dec 23. doi: 10.1111/dme.14221. [Epub ahead of print]

Low prevalence of maternal microchimerism in peripheral blood of Japanese children with type 1 diabetes.

Author information

1
Department of Molecular Endocrinology, National Research Institute for Child Health and Development, Tokyo, Japan.
2
Department of Paediatrics, Yokohama Rosai Hospital, Yokohama, Japan.
3
Department of Paediatrics, Osaka City University School of Medicine, Osaka, Japan.
4
Department of Paediatrics and Child Health, Nihon University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.
5
Department of Paediatrics, Division of Paediatric Endocrinology and Metabolism, Shikoku Medical Centre for Children and Adults, Kagawa, Japan.
6
Department of Paediatrics, Saitama Medical University, Faculty of Medicine, Saitama, Japan.
7
Department of Human Genetics, National Research Institute for Child Health and Development, Tokyo, Japan.
8
Department of Paediatrics, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Hamamatsu, Japan.
9
Department of Paediatrics, Tokyo Women's Medical University Medical Centre East, Tokyo, Japan.

Abstract

AIM:

To clarify the prevalence and degree of maternal microchimerism in Japanese children with type 1 diabetes, as well as its effect on phenotypic variation.

METHODS:

We studied 153 Japanese children with type 1 diabetes, including 124 children positive for β-cell autoantibodies, and their 71 unaffected siblings. The number of circulating microchimeric cells per 105 host cells was estimated by the use of quantitative-polymerase chain reaction targeting non-transmitted maternal human leukocyte antigen alleles. The results were compared to previous data from white European people. Phenotypic comparison was performed between maternal microchimerism carriers and non-carriers with diabetes.

RESULTS:

Maternal microchimerism was detected in 15% of children with autoantibody-positive type 1 diabetes, 28% of children with autoantibody-negative type 1 diabetes, and 16% of unaffected siblings. There were no differences in the prevalence or levels of maternal microchimerism among the three groups or between the children with type 1 diabetes and their unaffected siblings. Furthermore, maternal microchimerism carriers and non-carriers exhibited similar phenotypes.

CONCLUSIONS:

Maternal microchimerism appears to be less common in Japanese children with type 1 diabetes than in white European people. Our data indicate that maternal microchimerism is unlikely to be a major trigger or a phenotypic determinant of type 1 diabetes in Japanese children and that the biological significance of maternal microchimerism in type 1 diabetes may differ among ethnic groups.

PMID:
31872455
DOI:
10.1111/dme.14221

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wiley
Loading ...
Support Center