Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Dent Res Dent Clin Dent Prospects. 2019 Summer;13(3):227-233. doi: 10.15171/joddd.2019.035. Epub 2019 Oct 7.

Effect of thermal and mechanical cycles on shear bond strength of zirconia core to porcelain veneer under different surface treatments.

Author information

1
Department of Prosthodontics, Faculty of Dentistry, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran.

Abstract

Background. Due to the fragile nature of all-ceramic restorations, it is necessary to provide an appropriate (core) infrastructure to support the veneering porcelain. The veneer detachment and chipping are disadvantages of these restorations. Several techniques have been proposed to minimize these problems. This study evaluated the effect of thermal and mechanical cycles on the shear bond strength of zirconia core to porcelain veneer under different surface treatments. Methods. Sixty disk-like zirconium samples were randomly divided into three groups. The first group was polished and veneered with porcelain, without additional surface treatments. The two other groups were subjected to different surface treatments (modified aluminum oxide by silica and activator‒aluminum oxide and primer) and veneering with porcelain. Half of the samples in each group were subjected to 6000 thermal cycles and 20,000 masticatory cycles of 50 N to imitate the intraoral conditions; the other half were placed in distilled water at 37°C until the shear strength test. Each sample was then buried using PMMA in a mounting jig so that the gap between the core and the veneer could be placed upward. Then, they were exposed to shear stress using a universal testing machine at a rate of 1 mm/min until fracture. The maximum force leading to the fracture was recorded. Results. Comparison of the groups showed that the highest shear bond strength was related to the samples treated with aluminum oxide and primer, without applying thermal and masticatory cycles, which indicated no significant difference from the group treated with aluminum oxide and primer, with thermal and masticatory cycles. The lowest shear bond strengths were related to the polished samples without surface treatment by applying thermal and masticatory cycles (P=0.001), which indicated no significant difference from the untreated group without thermal and masticatory cycles. Conclusion. Based on the results, treatment with aluminum oxide and primer increased the shear bond strength of zirconia core to porcelain veneer. Thermocycling and masticatory cycles failed to reduce the shear bond strength in all the three groups significantly.

KEYWORDS:

Air abrasion; mechanical cycle; porcelain veneer; thermal cycle; zirconia

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center