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Indian J Dermatol Venereol Leprol. 2019 Dec 17. doi: 10.4103/ijdvl.IJDVL_114_19. [Epub ahead of print]

Type D personality is associated with poor quality of life, social performance, and psychological impairment in patients with moderate to severe psoriasis: A cross-sectional study of 130 patients.

Author information

1
Department of Dermatology, University Hospital Granada, Granada, Spain.
2
Department of Dermatology, University of Granada, Granada, Spain.

Abstract

Background:

Psoriasis is a systemic autoinflammatory disease that is related to an increased risk of organic and psychological comorbidities. Type D personality has been related to poor quality of life and worse physical and psychological outcomes in different diseases.

Aims:

The aim of this study is to explore whether type D personality is associated with an increased risk of presenting physical and/or psychological comorbidities, their relationship with the capacity of social adaptation, and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in patients with psoriasis.

Methods:

This was a cross-sectional study. In all, 130 patients with moderate to severe psoriasis were included in this study. Participants completed the DS14 test and different validated questionnaires regarding quality of life and psychological morbidities.

Results:

Type D personality was present in 38.4% (50/130) of the participants of the study. Patients with psoriasis and type D personality presented a higher risk of depression and anxiety. We observed that type D personality was associated with a lower educational level. These patients also presented a worse HRQOL in different dimensions of the Short Form Health Survey-36 questionnaire, more sleep problems, poor social adaptation, and a higher frequency of sexual disturbances.

Limitations:

Due to the cross-sectional design of the study, we could not confirm causality. Selection of sample was not random. Diagnoses of physical comorbidity were collected through clinical interview of patients under active treatment, which may imply a classification bias.

Conclusion:

Type D personality could represent a frequent personality profile in patients with psoriasis that could identify subjects with poor coping abilities to the disease with poorer levels of quality of life, increased psychological comorbidities, and inadequate social adaptation mechanisms.

KEYWORDS:

Adaptation; comorbidity; psoriasis; quality of life; type D personality

PMID:
31857521
DOI:
10.4103/ijdvl.IJDVL_114_19
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