Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Am Coll Cardiol. 2019 Dec 24;74(25):3139-3149. doi: 10.1016/j.jacc.2019.09.068.

Chili Pepper Consumption and Mortality in Italian Adults.

Author information

1
Department of Epidemiology and Prevention, IRCCS Neuromed, Via dell'Elettronica, Pozzilli, Italy. Electronic address: marialaura.bonaccio@neuromed.it.
2
Mediterranea Cardiocentro, Napoli, Italy.
3
Department of Epidemiology and Prevention, IRCCS Neuromed, Via dell'Elettronica, Pozzilli, Italy.
4
Department of Oncology and Molecular Medicine, Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Roma, Italy.
5
Department of Epidemiology and Prevention, IRCCS Neuromed, Via dell'Elettronica, Pozzilli, Italy; Department of Medicine and Surgery, Research Center in Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine (EPIMED), University of Insubria, Varese, Italy.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Chili pepper is a usual part of a traditional Mediterranean diet. Yet epidemiological data on the association between chili pepper intake and mortality risk are scarce, with a lack of studies from Mediterranean populations.

OBJECTIVES:

This study sought to examine the association between chili pepper consumption and risk of death in a large sample of the adult Italian general population, and to account for biological mediators of the association.

METHODS:

Longitudinal analysis was performed on 22,811 men and women enrolled in the Moli-sani Study cohort (2005 to 2010). Chili pepper intake was estimated by the EPIC (European Prospective Investigation Into Cancer) Food Frequency Questionnaire and categorized as none/rare consumption, up to 2 times/week, >2 to ≤4 times/week, and >4 times/week.

RESULTS:

Over a median follow-up of 8.2 years, a total of 1,236 deaths were ascertained. Multivariable hazard ratios (HRs) for all-cause and cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality among participants in the regular (>4 times/week) relative to none/rare intake were 0.77 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.66 to 0.90) and 0.66 (95% CI: 0.50 to 0.86), respectively. Regular intake was also inversely associated with ischemic heart disease (HR: 0.56; 95% CI: 0.35 to 0.87) and cerebrovascular (HR: 0.39; 95% CI: 0.20 to 0.75) death risks. The association of chili pepper consumption with total mortality appeared to be stronger in hypertension-free individuals (p for interaction = 0.021). Among known biomarkers of CVD, only serum vitamin D marginally accounted for such associations.

CONCLUSIONS:

In a large adult Mediterranean population, regular consumption of chili pepper is associated with a lower risk of total and CVD death independent of CVD risk factors or adherence to a Mediterranean diet. Known biomarkers of CVD risk only marginally mediate the association of chili pepper intake with mortality.

KEYWORDS:

Mediterranean diet; cardiovascular mortality; cerebrovascular mortality; chili pepper; inflammation; risk factors; total mortality

PMID:
31856971
DOI:
10.1016/j.jacc.2019.09.068

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center