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Sci Rep. 2019 Dec 18;9(1):19353. doi: 10.1038/s41598-019-55060-7.

Repotrectinib (TPX-0005), effectively reduces growth of ALK driven neuroblastoma cells.

Author information

1
Department of Medical Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Institute of Biomedicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, SE-405 30, Gothenburg, Sweden.
2
Mucosal Immunobiology and Vaccine Center (MIVAC), Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Institute of Biomedicine, University of Gothenburg, SE-405 30, Gothenburg, Sweden.
3
Turning Point Therapeutics, Inc. 10628 Science Center Drive, Suite 200, San Diego, California, 92121, United States.
4
Department of Medical Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Institute of Biomedicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, SE-405 30, Gothenburg, Sweden. ruth.palmer@gu.se.
5
Department of Medical Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Institute of Biomedicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, SE-405 30, Gothenburg, Sweden. bengt.hallberg@gu.se.

Abstract

Neuroblastoma is the most commonly diagnosed extracranial tumor in the first year of life. Approximately 9% of neuroblastoma patients present germline or somatic aberrations in the gene encoding for anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK). This increases in high-risk neuroblastomas, which have a 14% frequency of ALK aberrations at the time of diagnosis and show increasing numbers at relapse. Abrogating ALK activity with kinase inhibitors is employed as clinical therapy in malignancies such as non-small cell lung cancer and has shown good results in pediatric inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors and anaplastic large cell lymphomas. A phase I clinical trial of the first generation ALK inhibitor, crizotinib, in neuroblastoma patients showed modest results and suggested that further investigation was needed. Continuous development of ALK inhibitors has resulted in the third generation inhibitor repotrectinib (TPX-0005), which targets the active kinase conformations of ALK, ROS1 and TRK receptors. In the present study we investigated the effects of repotrectinib in a neuroblastoma setting in vitro and in vivo. Neuroblastoma cell lines were treated with repotrectinib to investigate inhibition of ALK and to determine its effect on proliferation. PC12 cells transfected with different ALK mutant variants were used to study the efficacy of repotrectinib to block ALK activation/signaling. The in vivo effect of repotrectinib was also analyzed in a neuroblastoma xenograft model. Our results show that repotrectinib is capable of inhibiting signaling activity of a range of ALK mutant variants found in neuroblastoma patients and importantly it exhibits strong antitumor effects in a xenograft model of neuroblastoma.

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