Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Eur Heart J. 2019 Dec 18. pii: ehz849. doi: 10.1093/eurheartj/ehz849. [Epub ahead of print]

Sleep patterns, genetic susceptibility, and incident cardiovascular disease: a prospective study of 385 292 UK biobank participants.

Fan M1,2, Sun D1,2, Zhou T1, Heianza Y1, Lv J2,3,4, Li L2, Qi L1,5.

Author information

1
Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, Tulane University, 1440 Canal Street, Suite 1724, New Orleans, LA 70112, USA.
2
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Peking University Health Science Center, 38 Xueyuan Road, Beijing 100191, China.
3
Key Laboratory of Molecular Cardiovascular Sciences (Peking University), Ministry of Education, 38 Xueyuan Road, Beijing 100191, China.
4
Peking University Institute of Environmental Medicine, 38 Xueyuan Road, Beijing 100191, China.
5
Department of Nutrition, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, 677 Huntington Ave, Boston, MA 02115, USA.

Abstract

AIMS:

To quantify the association of combined sleep behaviours and genetic susceptibility with the incidence of cardiovascular disease (CVD).

METHODS AND RESULTS:

This study included 385 292 participants initially free of CVD from UK Biobank. We newly created a healthy sleep score according to five sleep factors and defined the low-risk groups as follows: early chronotype, sleep 7-8 h per day, never/rarely insomnia, no snoring, and no frequent excessive daytime sleepiness. Weighted genetic risk scores of coronary heart disease (CHD) or stroke were calculated. During a median of 8.5 years of follow-up, we documented 7280 incident CVD cases including 4667 CHD and 2650 stroke cases. Compared to those with a sleep score of 0-1, participants with a score of 5 had a 35% (19-48%), 34% (22-44%), and 34% (25-42%) reduced risk of CVD, CHD, and stroke, respectively. Nearly 10% of cardiovascular events in this cohort could be attributed to poor sleep pattern. Participants with poor sleep pattern and high genetic risk showed the highest risk of CHD and stroke.

CONCLUSION:

In this large prospective study, a healthy sleep pattern was associated with reduced risks of CVD, CHD, and stroke among participants with low, intermediate, or high genetic risk.

KEYWORDS:

Cardiovascular disease; Genetic predisposition to disease; Sleep behaviour

PMID:
31848595
DOI:
10.1093/eurheartj/ehz849

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Silverchair Information Systems
Loading ...
Support Center