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J Biol Phys. 2019 Dec;45(4):423-430. doi: 10.1007/s10867-019-09537-1. Epub 2019 Dec 16.

Gibbs free energy of protein-protein interactions correlates with ATP production in cancer cells.

Author information

1
Chemical Engineering Department, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA, USA.
2
Microbiology Department, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA, USA.
3
College of Information and Computer Sciences, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA, USA.
4
Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Department, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA, USA.
5
Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada. jtus@phys.ualberta.ca.
6
Department of Oncology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada. jtus@phys.ualberta.ca.
7
DIMEAS, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129, Turin, Italy. jtus@phys.ualberta.ca.

Abstract

In this paper, we analyze several cancer cell types from two seemingly independent angles: (a) the over-expression of various proteins participating in protein-protein interaction networks and (b) a metabolic shift from oxidative phosphorylation to glycolysis. We use large data sets to obtain a thermodynamic measure of the protein-protein interaction network, namely the associated Gibbs free energy. We find a strong inverse correlation between the percentage of energy production via oxidative phosphorylation and the Gibbs free energy of the protein networks. The latter is a measure of functional dysregulation within the cell. Our findings corroborate earlier indications that signaling pathway upregulation in cancer cells is linked to the metabolic shift known as the Warburg effect; hence, these two seemingly independent characteristics of cancer phenotype may be interconnected.

KEYWORDS:

Cancer; Gibbs free energy; Protein-protein interactions

PMID:
31845118
PMCID:
PMC6917683
[Available on 2020-12-01]
DOI:
10.1007/s10867-019-09537-1

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