Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Clin Oral Implants Res. 2020 Feb;31(2):192-200. doi: 10.1111/clr.13564. Epub 2020 Jan 3.

Spontaneous progression of experimental peri-implantitis in augmented and pristine bone: A pre-clinical in vivo study.

Author information

1
Department of Periodontology, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
2
Centre for Applied Biostatistics, Occupational and Environmental Medicine, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To examine the progression of experimental peri-implantitis around different implants placed in augmented and pristine sites.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Six labrador dogs were used. Three months after tooth extraction, four implants with different surface modifications were installed on each side of the mandible. A standard osteotomy was applied on one side, while on the contralateral side the osteotomy was modified, resulting in a gap between the implant and the bone wall. The gap was filled with a bone substitute and covered by a resorbable membrane. Three months after implant installation, implants were exposed and healing abutments were connected. Two months later, oral hygiene procedures were abandoned and a cotton ligature was placed in a submarginal position around the neck of all implants and kept in place for 4 weeks. Following ligature removal, plaque formation continued for 6 months (spontaneous progression period). Radiographs were obtained throughout the experiment, and biopsies were collected and prepared for histological evaluation at the end of the spontaneous progression period.

RESULTS:

Differences in bone loss during the spontaneous progression period between pristine and augmented sites were small. The size and vertical dimension of the peri-implantitis lesion were larger at augmented than at pristine sites. Implants with non-modified surfaces exhibited smaller amounts of bone loss and smaller dimensions of peri-implantitis lesions than implants with modified surfaces.

CONCLUSION:

Small differences in spontaneous progression of peri-implantitis were detected between pristine and augmented sites. Implants with modified surfaces exhibited more bone loss and larger lesions than implants with non-modified surfaces, irrespective of the type of surrounding bone.

KEYWORDS:

bone substitute; dental implant; histology; implant surface; lesion; peri-implant disease; radiology; xenograft

PMID:
31838762
DOI:
10.1111/clr.13564
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wiley
Loading ...
Support Center