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Acta Trop. 2019 Dec 11;204:105297. doi: 10.1016/j.actatropica.2019.105297. [Epub ahead of print]

Identification and molecular characterization of mycobacteria isolated from animal sources in a developing country.

Author information

1
Department of Microbiology, School of Medicine, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran. Electronic address: Ramin.dibaj@gmail.com.
2
Department of Microbiology, School of Medicine, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran. Electronic address: hasanshojaei@msn.com.
3
Department of Microbiology, School of Medicine, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran. Electronic address: narimani@med.mui.ac.ir.

Abstract

The essential role of animals in the transmission of infectious diseases has long been recognized. Apart from zoonosis due to Mycobacterium bovis in domestic cattle, acquired mycobacterial zoonosis from animals are vastly under-reported worldwide. This is partly the result of not recognizing that animals can be the source of zoonotic nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) infection. The present study intended to be a contribution to the knowledge of somewhat neglected role of animals in harboring, maintenance and dissemination of NTM in the environment. A total of 326 samples from 250 animals were collected and analyzed for the presence of mycobacteria using standard protocols. The preliminary identification and Runyon's classification of isolates were performed by conventional tests. The PCR amplification of a 228 bp fragment of 65-kDa heat shock protein (hsp) gene was applied for the genus identification and the partial sequence analysis of 16S rRNA was applied for the species identification. In total 32 isolates including 26 rapidly growing and 6 slowly growing mycobacteria were recovered from 250 animal samples (12.8%). The isolates recovered from 21 (65.60%) fish, 8 (25%) insects and 3 (9.4%) house cats, dogs and mice. M. fortuitum was the most frequent Mycobacterium spp (13 isolates; 40.6% of all isolates), followed by M. abscessus-chelonae-M. saopaulense group, (5 isolates; 15.6% of all isolates), M. iranicum (3 isolates; 9.4% of all isolates),and M. marinum, M. terrae complex and M. chlorophenolicum (2 isolates each; 18.8% of all isolates), and the single isolates of M. mucogenicum, M. neoaurum, M. conceptionense, M. virginiense, and M. gordonae (5 isolates; 15.6% of all isolates). The current study indicates that a variety of animals can be a permanent or transient source of mycobacterial agents. This ensures the life cycle of the bacteria and the chance of their survival in the environment, which may pose a potential threat to human health.

KEYWORDS:

16S rRNA; Animal; Infection; Nontuberculous mycobacteria

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