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Folia Microbiol (Praha). 2019 Dec 13. doi: 10.1007/s12223-019-00756-6. [Epub ahead of print]

The volatile organic compound dimethylhexadecylamine affects bacterial growth and swarming motility of bacteria.

Author information

1
Instituto de Investigaciones Químico Biológicas, Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolás de Hidalgo, Morelia, Michoacán, México.
2
Department of Biology, Wilfrid Laurier University, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada.
3
Instituto de Investigaciones Químico Biológicas, Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolás de Hidalgo, Morelia, Michoacán, México. vcantero@umich.mx.

Abstract

Bacteria have developed different intra- and inter-specific communication mechanisms that involve the production, release, and detection of signaling molecules, because these molecules serve as the autoinducers involved in "quorum sensing" systems. Other communication mechanisms employ volatile signaling molecules that regulate different bacterial processes. The Arthrobacter agilis strain UMCV2 is a plant growth promoting actinobacterium, which induces plant growth and inhibits phytopathogenic fungi by emitting the dimethylhexadecylamine (DMHDA). However, little is known about the effect of this volatile compound on A. agilis UMCV2 itself, as well as on other bacteria. By exposing A. agilis UMCV2 and bacteria of the genus Bacillus and Pseudomonas to different concentrations of DMHDA, this study showed the dose-dependent effects of DMHDA on A. agilis UMCV2 growth, cellular viability, swarming motility, and expression of marker genes of the flagellar apparatus of bacteria. DMHDA was found to also modulate swarming motility of Bacillus sp. ZAP018 and P. fluorescens UM270, but not that of P. aeruginosa PA01. These data indicate that DMHDA is involved in both intra- and inter-specific bacterial interaction.

PMID:
31834593
DOI:
10.1007/s12223-019-00756-6

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