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Neural Regen Res. 2020 Jun;15(6):1111-1119. doi: 10.4103/1673-5374.266070.

Jidong cognitive impairment cohort study: objectives, design, and baseline screening.

Author information

1
School of public health, Shandong First Medical University & Shandong Academy of Medical Sciences, Taian, Shandong Province, China; School of Ophthalmology and Optometry, Eye Hospital, Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, Zhejiang Province, China.
2
School of Ophthalmology and Optometry, Eye Hospital, Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, Zhejiang Province, China.
3
Department of Neurology, The Affiliated Wenling Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University, Wenling, Zhejiang Province, China.
4
Department of Neuroepidemiology, Beijing Neurosurgical Institute; Capital Medical University, Beijing, China.
5
School of public health, Shandong First Medical University & Shandong Academy of Medical Sciences, Taian, Shandong Province, China.
6
Staff hospital of jidong oilfield, Caofeidian district, Tangshan, Hebei Province, China.

Abstract

The risk of dementia increases in patients with cognitive impairment. However, it is not clear what factors contribute to the onset of dementia in those with cognitive impairment. In this prospective cohort study, we will investigate the every-five-year incidence of cognitive impairment and prognostic factors for cognitive impairment. The Jidong cognitive impairment cohort was established from April 2012 to August 2015, during which we recruited 5854 healthy participants (55.1% male) older than 45 years (mean, 57 years). Participants received a health examination in the Staff Hospital, Jidong Oilfield Branch, China National Petroleum Corporation. Baseline data and blood samples were collected. Cognitive impairment was evaluated using the Mini-Mental State Examination, and was defined as a Mini-Mental State Examination score of less than 24. Dementia was assessed using the criteria of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (Fourth edition), the International Working Group criteria, and the Mini-Mental State Examination score. The follow-up will continue until December 2024, during which a prognostic model will be constructed. The primary outcome is the presence/absence of dementia and the secondary outcome is quality of life. Baseline screening results showed the following: (1) Cognitive impairment was apparent in 320 participants (5.5%). These participants will be excluded from the Jidong cohort study, and the remaining participants will be followed up. (2) Of the 320 participants with cognitive impairment, there was a significantly higher prevalence of illiteracy than other education levels (35.9%, P < 0.05). Age, arterial hypertension, alcohol consumption, and passive smoking differed significantly between the cognitive impairment and healthy groups (P < 0.05). Multivariate logistic regression models showed that age (odds ratio [OR] = 1.059, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.044-1.074) and arterial hypertension (OR = 1.665, 95% CI: 1.143-2.427) were risk factors for mild cognitive impairment. With the increase of educational level (illiteracy, primary school, junior high school, high school, university, and above), cognitive impairment gradually decreased (OR < 1, P < 0.05). (3) This cohort study has initially screened for several risk factors for cognitive impairment at baseline, and subsequent prospective data will further describe, validate, and evaluate the effects of these risk factors on cognitive impairment and dementia. These results can provide clinical evidence for the early prevention of cognitive impairment and dementia. The study was approved by the Ethics Committee of Kailuan General Hospital of Tangshan City and the Medical Ethics Committee, Staff Hospital, Jidong Oilfield Branch, China National Petroleum Corporation on July 12, 2013 (approval No. 2013 YILUNZI 1).

KEYWORDS:

Mini-Mental Status Examination Scale; assessment; cognitive impairment; community; dementia; follow-up; model; new basis; prevention; prognostic factors

PMID:
31823892
DOI:
10.4103/1673-5374.266070
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