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Vaccine. 2019 Dec 7. pii: S0264-410X(19)31616-0. doi: 10.1016/j.vaccine.2019.11.062. [Epub ahead of print]

A conjoint analysis of stated vaccine preferences in Shanghai, China.

Author information

1
Department of Immunization Program, Shanghai Municipal Centers for Disease Control & Prevention, NO. 1380, West Zhongshan Road, 200336, Shanghai, China. Electronic address: sunxiaodong@scdc.sh.cn.
2
Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of Michigan, 1415 Washington Heights, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA. Electronic address: awag@umich.edu.
3
Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of Michigan, 1415 Washington Heights, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA. Electronic address: jiahuiji@umich.edu.
4
Department of Immunization Program, Shanghai Municipal Centers for Disease Control & Prevention, NO. 1380, West Zhongshan Road, 200336, Shanghai, China. Electronic address: huangzhuoying@scdc.sh.cn.
5
Department of Health Behavior & Health Education, School of Public Health, University of Michigan, 1415 Washington Heights, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA; Department of Internal Medicine, Division of General Medicine, University of Michigan Medical School, 1500 East Medical Center Drive, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA. Electronic address: bzikmund@umich.edu.
6
Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of Michigan, 1415 Washington Heights, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA; Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Infectious Disease, University of Michigan Medical School, 1500 East Medical Center Drive, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA. Electronic address: mboulton@umich.edu.
7
Department of Immunization Program, Shanghai Municipal Centers for Disease Control & Prevention, NO. 1380, West Zhongshan Road, 200336, Shanghai, China. Electronic address: renjia@scdc.sh.cn.
8
Susan B. Meister Child Health Evaluation and Research Center, Department of Pediatrics, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI, USA. Electronic address: lisapros@umich.edu.

Abstract

It is not clear what kind of preferences parents in China would have for vaccines that could be added to a future immunization schedule. This study's aim was to assess Chinese parents' preferences for attributes of vaccines. We surveyed parents of young infants ≤3 months of age at immunization clinics in Shanghai, China, in 2017. We used a discrete choice experiment (DCE) to present parents with choices between two hypothetical profiles of vaccines which were described using the following attributes: cost, risk of side effect, location of vaccine manufacturer, vaccine testing, vaccine effectiveness, severity of disease, disease prevalence. A logistic regression output estimates of preference utilities. In total, 599 caregivers completed the DCE. Parents expressed lower preference for vaccines with a 30% chance of fever as an adverse event vs a 10% chance (OR: 0.53, 95% CI: 0.44, 0.64), for vaccines only 85% effective vs those 95% effective (OR: 0.55, 95% CI: 0.48, 0.62), and for imported vaccines (OR: 0.74, 95% CI: 0.60, 0.92) and those not tested in Chinese children (OR: 0.45, 95% CI: 0.37, 0.53) compared to domestic vaccines. More affluent groups preferred more expensive vaccines whereas less affluent groups did not express cost-based preferences. Promotion of vaccines in China should focus on parents' stated preferences, which include past testing done in Chinese children - which is, in fact, required of all licensed vaccines in China. Information about these trials could emphasize low risk of adverse events and high effectiveness.

KEYWORDS:

China; Conjoint analysis; Discrete choice experiment; Vaccine manufacturers

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