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Pediatr Neonatol. 2019 Nov 22. pii: S1875-9572(19)30548-0. doi: 10.1016/j.pedneo.2019.11.008. [Epub ahead of print]

Maternal exposure to air pollution and the risk of small for gestational age in offspring: A population-based study in Taiwan.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, National Taiwan University Hospital, National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan.
2
Institute of Occupational Medicine and Industrial Hygiene, National Taiwan University College of Public Health, Taipei, Taiwan.
3
Department of Pediatrics, National Taiwan University Hospital, National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan; Institute of Population Health Sciences, National Health Research Institutes, Miaoli, Taiwan; Department of Pediatrics, National Taiwan University Hospital Yun-Lin Branch, Yunlin County, Taiwan.
4
Department of Pediatrics, National Taiwan University Hospital, National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan; The Research Center of Developmental Biology and Regenerative Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan.
5
Department of Pediatrics, National Taiwan University Hospital, National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan. Electronic address: hcchou@ntu.edu.tw.
6
Institute of Population Health Sciences, National Health Research Institutes, Miaoli, Taiwan; Department of Public Health, National Taiwan University College of Public Health, Taipei, Taiwan; Department of Environmental and Occupational Medicine, National Taiwan University College of Medicine and Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan; Innovation and Policy Center for Population Health and Sustainable Environment, National Taiwan University College of Public Health, Taipei, Taiwan. Electronic address: pchen@ntu.edu.tw.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Exposure to air pollution has been associated with a wide range of adverse health effects; however, few studies addressed the relationship between ambient particulate matter as well as the compositions in particulate matter such as lead and the risk of small for gestational age (SGA) in offspring. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of maternal exposure to criteria air pollutants and the lead in total suspended particulate matter during pregnancy on SGA births in Taiwan.

METHODS:

This population study consisted of 322,513 singleton live births in Taiwan between 1996 and 2002. Daytime (7 AM-7 PM) exposure to particulate matter ≤10 μm (PM10), carbon monoxide (CO), sulfur dioxide (SO2), nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and ozone (O3), and monthly exposure to lead in total suspended particles (TSP) during each trimester were estimated. Generalized additive model (GAM) was used to assess the association between maternal exposure to particulate air pollutants and SGA births, taking into account potential confounders and gaseous air pollutants.

RESULTS:

We found significant association between the highest quartile (≥75th) of maternal PM10 exposure and SGA and demonstrated a significant exposure-response relationship. Furthermore, the highest quartile (≥75th) of maternal lead exposure was also associated with SGA during the second and third trimester of pregnancy, and there was a significant exposure-response relationship between maternal lead exposure and SGA during pregnancy.

CONCLUSION:

Maternal exposure to PM10 and lead in total suspended particulate matter during pregnancy was associated with an increased risk of SGA in offspring.

KEYWORDS:

air pollution; lead; pregnancy; small for gestational age

PMID:
31818536
DOI:
10.1016/j.pedneo.2019.11.008
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