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Microb Ecol. 2019 Dec 5. doi: 10.1007/s00248-019-01462-z. [Epub ahead of print]

Dominant and Subordinate Relationship Formed by Repeated Social Encounters Alters Gut Microbiota in Greater Long-Tailed Hamsters.

Zhao J1,2, Li G1,3, Lu W1,2, Huang S1,2, Zhang Z4,5.

Author information

1
State Key Laboratory of Integrated Management of Pest Insects and Rodents, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100101, People's Republic of China.
2
University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100049, People's Republic of China.
3
CAS Center for Excellence in Biotic Interactions, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100049, People's Republic of China.
4
State Key Laboratory of Integrated Management of Pest Insects and Rodents, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100101, People's Republic of China. zhangzb@ioz.ac.cn.
5
CAS Center for Excellence in Biotic Interactions, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100049, People's Republic of China. zhangzb@ioz.ac.cn.

Abstract

Social stress can dramatically influence the health of animals via communication between gut microbiota and the HPA system. However, this effect has been rarely investigated among different social ranked animals after chronic repeated social encounters. In this study, we evaluated changes and differences in microbiota among control, dominant, and subordinate male greater long-tailed hamsters (Tscherskia triton) over 28 successive days of repeated social encounter. Our results indicated that as compared with the control group, short-term repeated social encounters significantly altered fecal microbiota of subordinate hamsters, while chronic repeated social encounters altered colonic mucosa-associated microbiota of both dominant and subordinate hamsters. Fecal microbiota showed a transition in composition and diversity on day 2 for the subordinate group but on day 4 for the control and dominant groups under repeated encounters. Compared with their baseline, genus Lactobacillus increased in both dominant and subordinate groups, while genus Bifidobacterium increased in the subordinate group and genus Adlercreutzia increased in the dominant group. Our results suggest that chronic repeated social encounter can alter diversity and composition of gut microbiota of hamsters in both feces and colonic mucosa, but the latter performed better in reflecting the effects of chronic stress on microbiota in this species. Future studies should focus on elucidating how these microbiota alterations may affect animal behavior and fitness.

KEYWORDS:

Adlercreutzia; Aggressive behavior; Bifidobacterium; Dominant-subordinate relationship; Gut microbiota; Lactobacillus; Microbiota dynamic

PMID:
31807860
DOI:
10.1007/s00248-019-01462-z

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