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Ann N Y Acad Sci. 2019 Dec 3. doi: 10.1111/nyas.14270. [Epub ahead of print]

New research directions on disparities in obesity and type 2 diabetes.

Author information

1
Division of Diabetes, Endocrinology, and Metabolic Diseases, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland.
2
Drexel University Dornsife School of Public Health, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
3
Epidemiology and Statistics Branch, Division of Diabetes Translation, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Atlanta, Georgia.
4
Department of Family Medicine and Public Health, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California.
5
Division of Preventive Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama.
6
University of Chicago Medicine, Chicago, Illinois.
7
Oregon Health and Science University and Portland State University Joint School of Public Health, Portland, Oregon.
8
Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana.
9
Department of Health Promotion Sciences, University of Arizona Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health, Tucson, Arizona.
10
Washington University in St. Louis, School of Medicine and the Brown School, St. Louis, Missouri.
11
University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, Michigan.
12
Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and Welch Center for Prevention, Epidemiology & Clinical Research, Baltimore, Maryland.
13
David Geffen School of Medicine at the University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California.
14
Kaiser Permanente Center for Health Research, Portland, Oregon.
15
Colorado School of Public Health, Aurora, Colorado.
16
University of Arizona Health Sciences, Phoenix, Arizona.
17
Harvard/MGH Center on Genomics, Vulnerable Populations, and Health Disparities, Mongan Institute, Massachusetts General Hospital and Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.
18
University of North Carolina Gillings School of Global Public Health, Chapel Hill, North Carolina.
19
David Geffen School of Medicine at the University of California, and UCLA Fielding School of Public Health, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California.

Abstract

Obesity and type 2 diabetes disproportionately impact U.S. racial and ethnic minority communities and low-income populations. Improvements in implementing efficacious interventions to reduce the incidence of type 2 diabetes are underway (i.e., the National Diabetes Prevention Program), but challenges in effectively scaling-up successful interventions and reaching at-risk populations remain. In October 2017, the National Institutes of Health convened a workshop to understand how to (1) address socioeconomic and other environmental conditions that perpetuate disparities in the burden of obesity and type 2 diabetes; (2) design effective prevention and treatment strategies that are accessible, feasible, culturally relevant, and acceptable to diverse population groups; and (3) achieve sustainable health improvement approaches in communities with the greatest burden of these diseases. Common features of guiding frameworks to understand and address disparities and promote health equity were described. Promising research directions were identified in numerous areas, including study design, methodology, and core metrics; program implementation and scalability; the integration of medical care and social services; strategies to enhance patient empowerment; and understanding and addressing the impact of psychosocial stress on disease onset and progression in addition to factors that support resiliency and health.

KEYWORDS:

NIDDK; NIH; diabetes; disparities; obesity; social determinants

PMID:
31793006
DOI:
10.1111/nyas.14270

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