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Drug Alcohol Depend. 2019 Nov 8;206:107457. doi: 10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2019.04.028. [Epub ahead of print]

Correlates of cannabis and other illicit drugs use among secondary school adolescents in Nigeria.

Author information

1
Department of Clinical and Biological Sciences, University of Torino, Regione Gonzole 10, 10043 Orbassano, Torino, Italy; Piedmont Centre for Drug Addiction Epidemiology, ASL TO3, Via Sabaudia 164, 10095 Grugliasco, Torino, Italy. Electronic address: emina.mehanovic@unito.it.
2
United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime, Project Office, NDLEA Headquarters, 4 Onilegbale Road Road, Ikoyi, Lagos, Nigeria.
3
University of Jos, P.M.B. 2084, 93001 Jos, Plateau State, Nigeria.
4
Faculty for Education, Health and Social Work, University College Ghent, Valentin Vaerwyckweg 1, 9000 Ghent, Belgium.
5
Department of Clinical and Biological Sciences, University of Torino, Regione Gonzole 10, 10043 Orbassano, Torino, Italy; Piedmont Centre for Drug Addiction Epidemiology, ASL TO3, Via Sabaudia 164, 10095 Grugliasco, Torino, Italy.
6
Department of Clinical and Biological Sciences, University of Torino, Italy.
7
Technical Support Team, Piedmont Centre for Drug Addiction Epidemiology, Torino, Italy.
8
United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime, Project Office, Lagos, Nigeria.
9
University of Jos, Nigeria.
10
University College, Ghent, Belgium.
11
Federal Ministry of Education, Abuja, Nigeria.
12
National Drug Law Enforcement Agency, Nigeria.
13
National Agency for Food and Drug Administration and Control, Nigeria.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The burden of cannabis and other illicit drug use among youth represent a serious public health problem. The aim of the present study is to explore factors associated with cannabis and other illicit drug use among Nigerian secondary school adolescents of the six geopolitical zones of the country.

METHODS:

A total sample of 4078 secondary school adolescents of 32 schools from the six geopolitical zones of Nigeria participated in a cross-sectional survey in December 2015-January 2016. The association of sociodemographic characteristics, parental smoking, parental permissiveness to drink, friends' marijuana or other drugs use, risk perceptions and beliefs with the risk of lifetime cannabis and other illicit drugs use was examined through multilevel logistic regression models.

RESULTS:

The mean age of the students involved in the study was 14.7 years. Older age, living in one-parent or family structures different from both parents household, parental smoking, parental permissiveness to drink alcohol, friends' use of marijuana or other drugs, low risk perception of harmful effects, and positive beliefs on marijuana or drugs use were associated with the risk of cannabis and illicit drugs use. The indicator of socioeconomic status was associated to the risk of using cannabis, but not to the risk of using illicit drugs.

CONCLUSIONS:

The present study highlights some correlates that influence the uptake of cannabis and drugs among Nigerian adolescents. Preventive programs addressing these factors could help to reduce the burden of the problem. Specific attention should be given to interventions to contrast the incorrect beliefs and perceptions.

KEYWORDS:

Beliefs; Cannabis; Drugs; Nigeria; Risk perceptions; Secondary school adolescents

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