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Sci Rep. 2019 Nov 29;9(1):17981. doi: 10.1038/s41598-019-54442-1.

Flow cytometric identification and cell-line establishment of macrophages in naked mole-rats.

Author information

1
Division of Immunobiology, Institute for Genetic Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan.
2
Department of Rheumatology, Endocrinology and Nephrology, Graduate School of Medicine and Faculty of Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan.
3
Department of Aging and Longevity Research, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto, Japan.
4
Biomedical Animal Research Laboratory, Institute for Genetic Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan.
5
Department of Aging and Longevity Research, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto, Japan. miurak@kumamoto-u.ac.jp.
6
Biomedical Animal Research Laboratory, Institute for Genetic Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan. miurak@kumamoto-u.ac.jp.
7
Center for Metabolic Regulation of Healthy Aging, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto, Japan. miurak@kumamoto-u.ac.jp.
8
Division of Immunobiology, Institute for Genetic Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan. seino@igm.hokudai.ac.jp.

Abstract

Naked mole rats (NMRs) have extraordinarily long lifespans and anti-tumorigenic capability. Recent studies of humans and mice have shown that many age-related diseases, including cancer, are strongly correlated with immunity, and macrophages play particularly important roles in immune regulation. Therefore, NMR macrophages may contribute to their unique phenotypes. However, studies of the roles of macrophages are limited by material restrictions and the lack of an established experimental strategy. In this study, we developed a flow cytometric strategy to identify NMR macrophages. The NMR macrophages were extractable using an off-the-shelf anti-CD11b antibody, M1/70, and forward/side scatter data obtained by flow cytometry. NMR macrophages proliferated in response to human/mouse recombinant M-CSF and engulfed Escherichia coli particles. Interestingly, the majority of NMR macrophages exhibited co-staining with an anti-NK1.1 antibody, PK136. NK1.1 antigen crosslinking with PK136 results in mouse NK cell stimulation; similarly, NMR macrophages proliferated in response to NK1.1 antibody treatment. Furthermore, we successfully established an NMR macrophage cell line, NPM1, by transduction of Simian virus 40 early region that proliferated indefinitely without cytokines and retained its phagocytotic capacity. The NPM1 would contribute to further studies on the immunity of NMRs.

PMID:
31784606
DOI:
10.1038/s41598-019-54442-1
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