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Am J Health Behav. 2020 Jan 1;44(1):18-25. doi: 10.5993/AJHB.44.1.3.

Differential Use of Strategic Constructs of the Transtheoretical Model across Accelerometer-determined Sedentary Time.

Author information

1
Post-doctoral Research Associate, School of Applied Sciences, The University of Mississippi, University, MS.
2
Professor, Division of Epidemiology, Human Genetics and Environmental Sciences, School of Public Health Austin Regional Campus, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Austin, TX and Department of Kinesiology, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX.
3
Associate Professor, Division of Epidemiology, Human Genetics and Environmental Sciences, School of Public Health Austin Regional Campus, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Austin, TX and Department of Kinesiology, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX.
4
Assistant Professor, School of Community Health Sciences, Counseling and Counseling Psychology, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK;, Email: hohan@okstate.edu.

Abstract

Objectives: In this study, we investigated the differences in strategic constructs of the Transtheoretical Model (TTM) across accelerometer-determined sedentary time. Methods: A total of 201 college students participated in a TTM questionnaire for sedentary behavior and wore an accelerometer for 7 consecutive days to assess sedentary time. Multivariate analyses of variances (MANOVA) with post hoc pairwise comparisons were conducted to determine mean differences in the strategic constructs across quintiles of sedentary time. Tests for linear trends were conducted using orthogonal polynomial coefficients. Results: Compared with participants in higher quintiles of sitting time, 8 out of 10 processes of change (eg, mostly consciousness raising [η² p = .09]) were used significantly more frequently by those in the lowest quintile (p < .05) with negative linear trends (ptrend < .05). We found no statistically significant differences in the constructs of self-efficacy and decisional balance across the quintiles. Conclusions: Based on this preliminary analysis it appears that several intervention methods such as awareness raising, incentivization, self-motivation, and social norm building would be more beneficial to reduce sitting time or to protect their current sitting time from relapse.

PMID:
31783929
DOI:
10.5993/AJHB.44.1.3

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