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Addiction. 2019 Nov 29. doi: 10.1111/add.14903. [Epub ahead of print]

A Randomized Clinical Trial of Mobile Phone Motivational Interviewing for Alcohol Use Problems in Kenya.

Author information

1
Departments of Pediatrics and Psychiatry, University of Vermont, 1 S. Prospect Street, Burlington, VT, 05401, USA.
2
Africa Mental Health Foundation, P.O. Box 48423-00100, Nairobi, Kenya.
3
Department of Psychiatry, University of Nairobi, P.O. Box 19676-00202, Nairobi, Kenya.

Abstract

AIM:

To test the effectiveness of a motivational interviewing (MI) intervention using the mobile phone among adults with alcohol use problems.

DESIGN:

A randomized clinical trial of mobile MI and standard in-person MI with 1- and 6-month follow-up, including a one-month waitlist control followed by mobile MI.

SETTING:

A primary health center in rural Kenya.

PARTICIPANTS:

Three hundred adults screening positive for alcohol use problems were randomized and received immediate mobile MI (n=89), in-person MI (n=65), or delayed mobile MI (n=76) for waitlist controls one month after no treatment, with 70 unable to be reached for intervention.

INTERVENTION AND COMPARATOR:

One MI session was provided either immediately by mobile phone, in-person at the health center, or delayed by one month and then provided by mobile phone.

MEASUREMENTS:

Alcohol use problems were repeatedly assessed using the Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test (AUDIT) and the shorter AUDIT-C. The primary outcome was difference in alcohol score one month after no intervention for waitlist control vs. one month after MI for mobile MI. The secondary outcomes were difference in alcohol score for in-person MI vs. mobile MI one and six months after MI.

FINDINGS:

For our primary outcome, average AUDIT-C scores were nearly three points higher (Difference=2.88, 95% CI: 2.11, 3.66) for waitlist controls after one month of no intervention vs. mobile MI one month after intervention. Results for secondary outcomes supported the null hypothesis of no difference between in-person and mobile MI at one month (Bayes Factor=.22) but were inconclusive at six months (Bayes Factor=.41).

CONCLUSION:

Mobile phone-based motivational interviewing may be an effective treatment for alcohol use problems among adults visiting primary care in Kenya. Providing mobile motivational interviewing may help clinicians in rural areas reach patients needing treatment for alcohol use problems.

KEYWORDS:

HIV/AIDS; Kenya; Mobile intervention; alcohol use disorders; mHealth; motivational interviewing

PMID:
31782966
DOI:
10.1111/add.14903

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