Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Anaerobe. 2019 Nov 26;61:102132. doi: 10.1016/j.anaerobe.2019.102132. [Epub ahead of print]

Prevalence and characterization of Clostridioides difficile isolates from retail food products (vegetables and meats) in Japan.

Author information

1
Laboratory of Food Microbiology and Food Safety, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, Rakuno Gakuen University, Ebetsu, Hokkaido, Japan. Electronic address: usuima@rakuno.ac.jp.
2
Laboratory of Food Microbiology and Food Safety, Department of Health and Environmental Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, Rakuno Gakuen University, Ebetsu, Hokkaido, Japan.
3
Department of Microbiology, Sapporo Medical University School of Medicine, Sapporo, Japan.
4
Division of Laboratory Medicine, Sapporo Medical University Hospital, Sapporo, Japan.
5
Division of Laboratory Medicine, Sapporo Medical University Hospital, Sapporo, Japan; Department of Infection Control and Laboratory Medicine, Sapporo Medical University School of Medicine, Sapporo, Japan.

Abstract

The present study aimed to elucidate the prevalence of Clostridioides difficile in Japanese retail food products. For this purpose, retail food samples (242 fresh vegetables and 266 retail meat samples: 89 chicken meat; 28 chicken liver; 200 pork meat; 24 pig liver; 127 beef meat) were collected from 14 supermarkets between 2015 and 2019. C. difficile was isolated from eight (3.3%) fresh vegetable, six (6.7%) chicken meat, one (3.6%) chicken liver, one (0.5%) pork meat, and two (1.6%) beef meat samples; it was not isolated from pig liver. Of these isolates, 35% were toxigenic. All isolates were typable by PCR ribotyping and were resolved into 12 PCR ribotypes. Among these isolates, ribotype 014, which is distributed worldwide including in Japanese clinical cases, was detected among vegetable isolates. Therefore, although the C. difficile contamination rate in Japanese retail foods was low, these sources can be contaminated and could transmit these bacteria to humans.

KEYWORDS:

Clostridioides difficile; Meat; Retail food; Ribotype 014; Toxinotype XIb; Vegetables

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center