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Folia Microbiol (Praha). 2019 Nov 26. doi: 10.1007/s12223-019-00759-3. [Epub ahead of print]

Probiotics and prebiotics potential for the care of skin, female urogenital tract, and respiratory tract.

Author information

1
Center of Food Biotechnology and Bioseparations, Scientific and Technological Bioresource Nucleus, BIOREN and Department of Chemical Engineering, Universidad de La Frontera, Ave. Francisco Salazar 01145, Box 54-D,, Temuco, Chile. mariela.bustamante@ufrontera.cl.
2
(Retired) Formerly with the National Bioproducts and Bioprocesses Program, Pacific Agri-Food Research Centre, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Summerland, BC V0H 1Z0, Canada.
3
Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences of Ribeirão Preto/FCFRP, Universidade de São Paulo, Ave. do Café, s/n-Bloco Q, Bairro Monte Alegre, Ribeirão Preto-SP, 14040-903,, Brazil.
4
Agriaquaculture Nutritional Genomic Center, CGNA, Las Heras 350, Temuco, Chile.
5
Center of Food Biotechnology and Bioseparations, Scientific and Technological Bioresource Nucleus, BIOREN and Department of Chemical Engineering, Universidad de La Frontera, Ave. Francisco Salazar 01145, Box 54-D,, Temuco, Chile.
6
Centre for Biotechnology and Bioengineering (CeBiB), Universidad de La Frontera, Temuco, Chile.

Abstract

The prebiotics and probiotics market is constantly growing due to the positive effects of its consumption on human health, which extends beyond the digestive system. In addition, the synbiotic products market is also expanding due to the synergistic effects between pre- and probiotics that provide additional benefits to consumers. Pre- and probiotics are being evaluated for their effectiveness to treat and prevent infectious diseases in other parts of the human body where microbial communities exist. This review examines the scientific data related to the effects of pre- and probiotics on the treatment of diseases occurring in the skin, female urogenital tract, and respiratory tract. The evidence suggests that probiotics consumption can decrease the presence of eczema in children when their mothers have consumed probiotics during pregnancy and lactation. In women, probiotics consumption can effectively prevent recurrent urinary tract infections. The consumption of synbiotic products can reduce respiratory tract infections and their duration and severity. However, the outcomes of the meta-analyses are still limited and not sufficiently conclusive to support the use of probiotics to treat infectious diseases. This is largely a result of the limited number of studies, lack of standardization of the studies, and inconsistencies between the reported results. Therefore, it is advisable that future studies consider these shortcomings and include the evaluation of the combined use of pre- and probiotics.

KEYWORDS:

Female urogenital system; Prebiotics; Probiotics; Respiratory tract; Skin

PMID:
31773556
DOI:
10.1007/s12223-019-00759-3

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