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MedEdPORTAL. 2019 Aug 23;15:10831. doi: 10.15766/mep_2374-8265.10831.

Motivational Interviewing: A High-Yield Interactive Session for Medical Trainees and Professionals to Help Tobacco Users Quit.

Author information

1
Associate Professor, Department of Pediatrics, Renaissance School of Medicine at Stony Brook University.
2
Director, Adolescent Health Promotion, American Academy of Pediatrics.
3
Associate Professor, Department of Pediatrics, University of California, San Francisco, School of Medicine.
4
Professor, Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School.
5
Professor, Pediatrics, MassGeneral Hospital for Children.
6
Director of Translational Research, American Academy of Pediatrics Julius B. Richmond Center of Excellence.
7
Director of Pediatric Research, Tobacco Research and Treatment Center, Massachusetts General Hospital.

Abstract

Introduction:

Motivational interviewing (MI) is a collaborative patient-focused counseling technique that is effective in promoting smoking cessation but is not consistently taught/practiced in training.

Methods:

This training session was implemented in a pediatric residency training program and also given four times to pediatric practitioners as part of a 2-day tobacco training sponsored by the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP). Pediatric residents (N = 33) participated in a 1-hour interactive session focused on addressing tobacco. Knowledge was assessed with pre- and 6-month postsurveys. Retention of skills was evaluated between 6 and 9 months posttraining by resident performance on two scenarios with standardized patients, which was scored utilizing the Behavior Change Counseling Index (BECCI), by two MI-trained physicians. AAP trainees (N = 115) participated in tobacco trainings with a session dedicated to MI; sessions were evaluated by pre- and posttests.

Results:

Residents who completed the session (n = 12) performed significantly better on eight of 10 items of the BECCI and on the overall BECCI score (p < .001) compared with those who had not completed the session (n = 12). Feedback on AAP training sessions (N = 115) indicated that practitioners felt able to perform MI and incorporate MI into practice. The percentage of trainees who felt comfortable counseling about tobacco doubled from pre- to posttraining.

Discussion:

A hands-on MI training session provided pediatric residents and practicing clinicians with knowledge and skills to address tobacco use with patients/families. The session is easily incorporated into different training environments.

KEYWORDS:

Motivational Interviewing; Pediatrics; Preventive Medicine; Tobacco; Tobacco Smoke Exposure

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