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Nat Commun. 2019 Nov 26;10(1):5372. doi: 10.1038/s41467-019-13029-0.

Contribution of apical and basal dendrites to orientation encoding in mouse V1 L2/3 pyramidal neurons.

Author information

1
Brigham and Women's Hospital and Jamaica Plain VA Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. jiyoung.p.neurons@gmail.com.
2
Program in Structural and Computational Biology and Molecular Biophysics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA. jiyoung.p.neurons@gmail.com.
3
Institute of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology (IMBB), Foundation of Research and Technology Hellas (FORTH), Vassilika Vouton, Heraklion, Crete, Greece.
4
Brigham and Women's Hospital and Jamaica Plain VA Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.
5
Department of Neuroscience, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA.
6
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, USA.
7
Department of Neurology, University of California, Los Angeles, USA.
8
Institute of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology (IMBB), Foundation of Research and Technology Hellas (FORTH), Vassilika Vouton, Heraklion, Crete, Greece. poirazi@imbb.forth.gr.
9
Brigham and Women's Hospital and Jamaica Plain VA Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. smsmirnakis@bwh.harvard.edu.

Abstract

Pyramidal neurons integrate synaptic inputs from basal and apical dendrites to generate stimulus-specific responses. It has been proposed that feed-forward inputs to basal dendrites drive a neuron's stimulus preference, while feedback inputs to apical dendrites sharpen selectivity. However, how a neuron's dendritic domains relate to its functional selectivity has not been demonstrated experimentally. We performed 2-photon dendritic micro-dissection on layer-2/3 pyramidal neurons in mouse primary visual cortex. We found that removing the apical dendritic tuft did not alter orientation-tuning. Furthermore, orientation-tuning curves were remarkably robust to the removal of basal dendrites: ablation of 2 basal dendrites was needed to cause a small shift in orientation preference, without significantly altering tuning width. Computational modeling corroborated our results and put limits on how orientation preferences among basal dendrites differ in order to reproduce the post-ablation data. In conclusion, neuronal orientation-tuning appears remarkably robust to loss of dendritic input.

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