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PLoS Med. 2019 Nov 26;16(11):e1002969. doi: 10.1371/journal.pmed.1002969. eCollection 2019 Nov.

Stigma as a fundamental hindrance to the United States opioid overdose crisis response.

Author information

1
Center for Global Health, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America.
2
Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America.
3
Mbarara University of Science and Technology, Mbarara, Uganda.
4
Center for Population Health Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, United States of America.
5
Department of Health Policy and Management, Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America.
6
Division of General Internal Medicine and Primary Care, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America.
7
Northeastern University School of Law, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America.
8
Bouvé College of Health Sciences, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America.
9
Division of Infectious Diseases and Global Public Health, University of California at San Diego School of Medicine, San Diego, California, United States of America.
10
Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York City, New York, United States of America.
11
Department of Health Policy and Management, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America.
12
Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America.
13
Department of Medical Ethics and Health Policy, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States of America.
14
Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States of America.

Abstract

Alexander Tsai and co-authors discuss the role of stigma in responses to the US opioid crisis.

PMID:
31770387
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pmed.1002969
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Conflict of interest statement

The authors of this manuscript have read the journal's policy and have the following competing interests: ACT receives a stipend as a Specialty Consulting Editor for PLOS Medicine and serves on the journal’s Editorial Board. ACT and SS are Guest Editors for the PLOS Medicine Special Issue on Substance Use, Misuse and Dependence. MLB has been retained as an expert witness in litigation against opioid manufacturers. SEW has received research funding from Optum Labs for a study using Optum claims data to evaluate the comparative effectiveness of different treatment pathways for opioid use disorder.

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