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Vet Microbiol. 2019 Dec;239:108482. doi: 10.1016/j.vetmic.2019.108482. Epub 2019 Nov 4.

Analysing nonsynonymous mutations between two Mycobacterium bovis strains with contrasting pathogenic profiles.

Author information

1
Universidad de Buenos Aires, Facultad de Agronomía, Cátedra de Microbiología Agrícola, INBA-CONICET, Buenos Aires, Argentina. Electronic address: mebigi@hotmail.com.
2
Instituto de Biotecnología, IABIMO, CICVyA/INTA, Argentina. Electronic address: vazquez.cristina@inta.gob.ar.
3
Faculdade de Medicina Veterinária e Zootecnia, Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso do Sul, Campo Grande, Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil. Electronic address: anabia_85@yahoo.com.br.
4
Instituto de Biotecnología, IABIMO, CICVyA/INTA, Argentina.
5
Instituto de Biotecnología, IABIMO, CICVyA/INTA, Argentina. Electronic address: cataldi.angeladrian@inta.gob.ar.
6
Colorado State University, Dept. of Microbiology, Immunology and Pathology, USA. Electronic address: Mary.Jackson@ColoState.EDU.
7
Colorado State University, Dept. of Microbiology, Immunology and Pathology, USA. Electronic address: M.Mcneil@ColoState.EDU.
8
Universidad de Buenos Aires, Facultad de Agronomía, Cátedra de Microbiología Agrícola, INBA-CONICET, Buenos Aires, Argentina. Electronic address: soria@agro.uba.ar.
9
Instituto de Biotecnología, IABIMO, CICVyA/INTA, Argentina. Electronic address: zumarraga.martin@inta.gob.ar.
10
Laboratory of Physiology and Genetics of Actinomycetes, Instituto de Biología Molecular y Celular de Rosario (IBR-CONICET), Facultad de Ciencias Bioquímicas y Farmacéuticas, Universidad Nacional de Rosario, Rosario, Argentina. Electronic address: cabruja@ibr-conicet.gov.ar.
11
Laboratory of Physiology and Genetics of Actinomycetes, Instituto de Biología Molecular y Celular de Rosario (IBR-CONICET), Facultad de Ciencias Bioquímicas y Farmacéuticas, Universidad Nacional de Rosario, Rosario, Argentina. Electronic address: gago@ibr-conicet.gov.ar.
12
Instituto de Biotecnología, IABIMO, CICVyA/INTA, Argentina. Electronic address: blanco.federico@inta.gob.ar.
13
Faculdade de Computação, Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso do Sul, Campo Grande, Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil. Electronic address: cnishibe@gmail.com.
14
Faculdade de Computação, Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso do Sul, Campo Grande, Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil. Electronic address: nalvo@facom.ufms.br.
15
Embrapa Gado de Corte, Campo Grande, Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil. Electronic address: flabio.araujo@embrapa.br.
16
Instituto de Biotecnología, IABIMO, CICVyA/INTA, Argentina. Electronic address: bigi.fabiana@inta.gob.ar.

Abstract

Mycobacterium bovis (M. bovis) is the causative agent of bovine tuberculosis, a chronic infectious disease that can affect cattle, other domesticated species, wild animals and humans. This disease produces important economic losses worldwide. Two M. bovis strains (04-303 and 534) have been isolated in Argentina. Whereas the 04-303 strain was isolated from a wild boar, the 534 strain was obtained from cattle. In a previous study, six weeks after infection, the 04-303 strain induced 100% mortality in mice. By contrast, mice infected with the 534 strain survived, with limited tissue damage, after four months. In this study we compared all predictive proteins encoded in both M. bovis genomes. The comparative analysis revealed 141 polymorphic proteins between both strains. From these proteins, nine virulence proteins showed polymorphisms in 04-303, whereas five did it in the 534 strain. Remarkably, both strains contained a high level of polymorphism in proteins related to phthiocerol dimycocerosate (PDIM) synthesis or transport. Further experimental evidence indicated that only mutations in the 534 strain have an impact on PDIM synthesis. The observed reduction in PDIM content in the 534 strain, together with its low capacity to induce phagosome arrest, may be associated with the reported deficiency of this strain to replicate and survive inside bovine macrophages. The findings of this study could contribute to a better understanding of pathogenicity and virulence aspects of M. bovis, which is essential for further studies aiming at developing new vaccines and diagnostic techniques for bovines.

KEYWORDS:

Genome; Mutations; Mycobacterium bovis; Virulence gene

PMID:
31759775
DOI:
10.1016/j.vetmic.2019.108482
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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