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Version 3. Wellcome Open Res. 2019 Sep 25 [revised 2019 Sep 25];2:14. doi: 10.12688/wellcomeopenres.10535.3. eCollection 2017.

Insights into pancreatic β cell energy metabolism using rodent β cell models.

Author information

1
Nuffield Department of Obstetrics & Gynaecology, The Women's Centre, University of Oxford, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford, UK.
2
Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford, UK.
3
BRC Translational Immunology Lab, NIHR, Nuffield Department of Medicine, University of Oxford, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford, UK.
4
Institute of Cellular Medicine, Haematological Sciences, Medical School, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK.
5
Clinical Biochemistry, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford, UK.
6
Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.
7
Department of Paediatrics, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland.
8
Luxcel BioSciences Ltd, BioInnovation Centre, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland.

Abstract

Background: Mitochondrial diabetes is primarily caused by β-cell failure, a cell type whose unique properties are important in pathogenesis. Methods: By reducing glucose, we induced energetic stress in two rodent β-cell models to assess effects on cellular function. Results: Culturing rat insulin-secreting INS-1 cells in low glucose conditions caused a rapid reduction in whole cell respiration, associated with elevated mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production, and an altered glucose-stimulated insulin secretion profile. Prolonged exposure to reduced glucose directly impaired mitochondrial function and reduced autophagy. Conclusions: Insulinoma cell lines have a very different bioenergetic profile to many other cell lines and provide a useful model of mechanisms affecting β-cell mitochondrial function.

KEYWORDS:

beta-cell; insulin secretion; mitochondria; oxidative phosphorylation; reactive oxygen species; superoxide

Conflict of interest statement

Competing interests: JH is an employee of Luxcel Biosciences. None of the other authors have competing interests.

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