Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Prev Chronic Dis. 2019 Nov 21;16:E154. doi: 10.5888/pcd16.190054.

A School-Based Intervention Using Health Mentors to Address Childhood Obesity by Strengthening School Wellness Policy.

Author information

1
Division of Pediatric Emergency Medicine, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, New York.
2
Department of General Pediatrics, New York University School of Medicine, Bellview Hospital Center, New York, New York.
3
Department of Pediatrics, Children's Hospital of Orange County, Irvine, California.
4
Department of General Pediatrics, Valley Children's Healthcare, Irvine, California.
5
Department of General Pediatrics, Cincinnati Children's Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio.
6
Department of General Pediatrics, Children's National Hospital, Washington, District of Columbia.
7
Author members of Team KiPOW are listed in Acknowledgments.
8
Division of Biostatistics and Study Methodology, Children's National Hospital, Washington, District of Columbia.
9
Department of Pediatrics, University of California, Irvine School of Medicine, Irvine, California.
10
Pediatric Exercise and Genomics Research Center (PERC), University of California, Irvine School of Medicine, Irvine, California.
11
Center for Translational Research, Children's National Hospital, Washington, District of Columbia.
12
Division of Pediatric Cardiology, Children's National Hospital, Washington, District of Columbia.
13
George Washington University School of Medicine, Center for Translational Research, Children's National Hospital, 111 Michigan Ave NW, Washington, DC 20010. Email: mmsnyder@childrensnational.org.

Abstract

PURPOSE AND OBJECTIVES:

The objective of our study was to strengthen wellness policy in Title 1 schools by implementing a mentored behavior-change model that extends the continuum of care from academic to community settings and mobilizes existing public resources in accordance with US Preventive Services Task Force screening guidelines for childhood obesity management.

INTERVENTION APPROACH:

Team Kid POWER! (KiPOW!) health mentors (students and trainees in medical and health-related fields) in 2 geographically and demographically distinct school districts, the District of Columbia and Orange County, California, delivered standardized health curricular modules to fifth grade classrooms, modeled healthy eating behaviors during school lunchtime, and engaged in active play at recess.

EVALUATION METHODS:

Initial interventions in the the District of Columbia and Orange County delivered 10 sessions in which all participants received the intervention. Two subsequent interventions in Orange County, for 5 weeks (Lite) and 10 weeks (Full), included controls. Pre-post measurements of body mass index (BMI) and blood pressure were documented in all participants. A mixed linear regression model, which included a random effect for each school, estimated differences between Full and Lite interventions compared with controls, adjusting for site, sex, and baseline status of the dependent variable.

RESULTS:

KiPOW! Full, but not KiPOW! Lite, was associated with a modest reduction in BMI percentile compared with control (KiPOW! Full, P = .04; KiPOW! Lite, P = .41), especially in Orange County (P < .001). Systolic blood pressure improved in Full (P < .046) more than in Lite interventions (P = .11), and diastolic blood pressure improved in both Full (P = .02) and Lite (P = .03) interventions. Annual renewal of the school and volunteer commitment needed to maintain KiPOW! was found to be sustainable.

IMPLICATIONS FOR PUBLIC HEALTH:

KiPOW! is a generalizable academic-community partnership promoting face-to-face contact between students and trusted health mentors to reinforce school wellness policies and foster youth confidence in decision-making about nutrition- and activity-related behaviors to achieve reduced BMI percentile and lowered blood pressure.

PMID:
31753082
DOI:
10.5888/pcd16.190054
Free full text

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Loading ...
Support Center