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Eur J Public Health. 2019 Nov 20. pii: ckz209. doi: 10.1093/eurpub/ckz209. [Epub ahead of print]

Knowledge and beliefs on vaccines among a sample of Italian pregnant women: results from the NAVIDAD study.

Author information

1
Department of Public Health, University of Torino, Torino, Italy.
2
Department of Biomedical Sciences for Health, University of Milan, Milano, Italy.
3
Fondazione IRCCS Cà Granda OMP, Milano, Italy.
4
Fondazione Policlinico Universitario A. Gemelli IRCCS, Roma, Italy.
5
Institute of Public Health, Hygiene Section, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Roma, Italy.
6
Department of Biomedical Sciences and Public Health, Università Politecnica delle Marche, Ancona, Italy.
7
Department of Pharmacy, Università degli Studi "G. D'Annunzio" of Chieti-Pescara, Chieti, Italy.
8
Department of Biomedical and Neuromotor Sciences (DIBINEM), University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy.
9
Department of Life, Health and Environmental Sciences, University of L'Aquila, L'Aquila, Italy.
10
Department of Medical Sciences, University of Ferrara, Ferrara, Italy.
11
Department of Public Health, University of Naples "Federico II", Napoli, Italy.
12
Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences and Advanced Technologies "G.F. Ingrassia", Section of Hygiene and Preventive Medicine, University of Catania, Catania, Italy.
13
Public Health Section, Department of Experimental Medicine, University of Perugia, Perugia, Italy.
14
Department of Molecular and Developmental Medicine, University of Siena, Siena, Italy.
15
Department of Public Health and Infectious Diseases, Sapienza University of Roma, Roma, Italy.
16
Department of Biomedical and Dental Sciences and Morphofunctional Imaging, University of Messina, Messina, Italy.
17
Department of Medicine and Surgery, University of Parma, Parma, Italy.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Vaccine hesitancy is an emerging phenomenon in European countries and leads to decreasing trends in infant vaccine coverage. The aim of this study was to analyze the level of confidence and correct awareness about immunizations, which are crucial for the success of vaccination programmes.

METHODS:

As part of the NAVIDAD multicentre study, we examined vaccination confidence and complacency among a sample of 1820 pregnant women from 14 Italian cities. The questionnaire assessed the interviewee's knowledge, beliefs and misconceptions, as well as their socioeconomic status, information sources about vaccines and confidence in the Italian National Healthcare Service.

RESULTS:

Only 9% of women completely believed to the efficacy, necessity and safety of vaccinations. Almost 20% of them had misconceptions on most of the themes. There was a significant difference in the level of knowledge considering educational level: women with a high educational level have less probability of obtaining a low knowledge score (odds ratio (OR) 0.43 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.34-0.54]). The level of knowledge was also influenced by the sources of information: women who received information from their general practitioner (GP) and from institutional websites had a significantly lower chance of having misconceptions (OR 0.74 [95% CI 0.58-0.96]; OR 0.59 [95% CI 0.46-0.74]). Finally, the results underlined the influence of trust in healthcare professional information on the likelihood of having misconceptions (OR 0.49 [95% CI 0.27-0.89]).

CONCLUSIONS:

The data suggest the efficacy of GPs and institutional websites as a source of information to contrast misconceptions and underline the importance of confidence in the healthcare system to increase complacency and confidence in vaccines.

PMID:
31746999
DOI:
10.1093/eurpub/ckz209

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