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Bone Marrow Transplant. 2019 Nov 19. doi: 10.1038/s41409-019-0752-5. [Epub ahead of print]

Clinical practice recommendations for the diagnosis and management of human herpesvirus-6B encephalitis after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: the Japan Society for Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation.

Author information

1
Department of Hematology, Oita University Hospital, Oita, Japan. mogata@oita-u.ac.jp.
2
Department of Hematology, Toranomon Hospital, Tokyo, Japan.
3
Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Division, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo, Japan.
4
Division of Hematology, Department of Internal Medicine, Hyogo College of Medicine, Hyogo, Japan.
5
Department of Hematology, Harasanshin Hospital, Fukuoka, Japan.
6
Department of Hematology and Oncology, Tokai University School of Medicine, Kanagawa, Japan.
7
Department of Medicine and Biosystemic Science, Kyushu University Graduate School of Medical Science, Fukuoka, Japan.
8
Department of Hematology, Nagano Red Cross Hospital, Nagano, Japan.
9
Department of Pediatrics, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Miyagi, Japan.
10
Department of Hematology and Oncology, Anjo Kosei Hospital, Aichi, Japan.
11
Department of Hematology/Oncology, Osaka Women's and Children's Hospital, Osaka, Japan.
12
Department of Hematology/Oncology, Hyogo Prefectural Kobe Children's Hospital, Hyogo, Japan.
13
Division of Stem Cell Transplantation, Niigata University Medical and Dental Hospital, Niigata, Japan.
14
Division of Hematology, Department of Medicine, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.

Abstract

Reactivation of human herpesvirus (HHV)-6B is relatively common after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) and HHV-6B diseases may consequently develop. Among them, HHV-6B encephalitis is a serious and often fatal complication. The aim of these clinical practice recommendations is to provide diagnostic and therapeutic guidance for HHV-6B encephalitis after allogeneic HSCT. In this evidence-based review, we critically evaluated data from the published literature. The Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) methodology was used to assist in generating recommendations. We have summarized the findings that contribute to decision-making and we have provided our recommendations. In cases where rigorous clinical data are unavailable, recommendations have been developed in discussions with physicians who have relevant expertize.

PMID:
31745253
DOI:
10.1038/s41409-019-0752-5

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