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Dev Cell. 2019 Nov 18;51(4):516-525.e5. doi: 10.1016/j.devcel.2019.10.021.

Emergence of a Bilaterally Symmetric Pattern from Chiral Components in the Planarian Epidermis.

Author information

1
Université de Paris, Institut Jacques Monod, CNRS UMR 7592, Paris 75013, France.
2
Institut Pasteur, Paris 75015, France.
3
Max Planck Institute for Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics, Dresden 01307, Germany.
4
INSERM U955, Créteil 94010, France; CNRS ERL7240, Créteil 94010, France; Faculté de Médecine, Université Paris-Est, Créteil 94010, France.
5
INSERM U955, Créteil 94010, France; CNRS ERL7240, Créteil 94010, France; Hôpital Kremlin-Bicêtre, AP-HP, Le Kremlin-Bicêtre 94275, France; Faculté de Médecine, Université Paris-Saclay, Le Kremlin-Bicêtre 94070, France.
6
Université de Paris, Institut Jacques Monod, CNRS UMR 7592, Paris 75013, France. Electronic address: juliette.azimzadeh@ijm.fr.

Abstract

Most animals exhibit mirror-symmetric body plans, yet the molecular constituents from which they are formed are often chiral. In planarian flatworms, centrioles are arranged in a bilaterally symmetric pattern across the ventral epidermis. Here, we found that this pattern is generated by a network of centrioles with prominent chiral asymmetric properties. We identify centriole components required for establishing asymmetric connections between centrioles and balancing their effects to align centrioles along polarity fields. SMED-ODF2, SMED-VFL1, and SMED-VFL3 affect the assembly of centriole appendages that tether cytoskeletal connectors to position the centrioles. We further show that the medio-lateral polarization of centrioles relies on mechanisms that are partly distinct on the left and right sides of the planarian body. Our findings shed light on how bilaterally symmetrical patterns can emerge from chiral cellular organizations.

KEYWORDS:

ODF2; VFL1; VFL3; basal foot; centriole; chirality; cilia; multi-ciliated cell; planar cell polarity; planaria

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