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Stem Cell Res. 2019 Oct 17;41:101587. doi: 10.1016/j.scr.2019.101587. [Epub ahead of print]

Two iPSC lines generated from the bone marrow of a relapsed/refractory AML patient display normal karyotypes and myeloid differentiation potential.

Author information

1
Department of Biological Sciences, University of Notre Dame, IN 46556, United States; Center for Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine, University of Notre Dame, IN 46556, United States.
2
Department of Biological Sciences, University of Notre Dame, IN 46556, United States.
3
Institute for Genomic Medicine, University of California San Diego, CA 92093, United States.
4
Department of Biological Sciences, University of Notre Dame, IN 46556, United States; Center for Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine, University of Notre Dame, IN 46556, United States; Harper Cancer Research Institute, University of Notre Dame, IN 46556, United States. Electronic address: apanopou@nd.edu.

Abstract

Using iPSCs to study cancer has been complicated by the fact that many cancer cells are difficult to reprogram, which has been attributed to the genomic abnormalities present. Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) is a complex disease that presents with various types of genomic aberrations that affect prognosis. Here we reprogrammed CD34+ cells from an AML patient containing a rare der(7)t(7;13) translocation associated with poor prognosis, who had relapsed and was refractory to current treatments. The generated AML-iPSCs displayed normal karyotypes and myeloid differentiation potential. These findings have implications for modeling and treating AML disease.

KEYWORDS:

Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Bone marrow cells; Disease modeling; Induced pluripotent stem cells; Reprogramming

PMID:
31739201
DOI:
10.1016/j.scr.2019.101587
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