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J Affect Disord. 2020 Feb 1;262:149-154. doi: 10.1016/j.jad.2019.11.013. Epub 2019 Nov 4.

The effect of atorvastatin on cognition and mood in bipolar disorder and unipolar depression patients: A secondary analysis of a randomized controlled trial.

Author information

1
Geri-PARTy Research Group, Jewish General Hospital/Lady Davis Institute, McGill University, Montreal, Canada. Electronic address: jfs702@mun.ca.
2
Department of Psychiatry, College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; Department of Psychiatry, McGill University, Montreal, Canada.
3
Douglas Mental Health University Institute, Montreal, QC, Canada.
4
Department of Psychiatry, Centre for Addictions and Mental Health, University of Toronto, Canada.
5
Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Canada.
6
Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Occupational Health, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Canada.
7
Division of Nephrology, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Canada.
8
Geri-PARTy Research Group, Jewish General Hospital/Lady Davis Institute, McGill University, Montreal, Canada.
9
Department of Psychiatry, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Canada.
10
Department of Psychiatry, GGZ, inGeest, Amsterdam, the Netherlands.
11
Department of Psychiatry, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Canada.
12
Department of Psychiatry, McGill University, Montreal, Canada; Douglas Mental Health University Institute, Montreal, QC, Canada.
13
Geri-PARTy Research Group, Jewish General Hospital/Lady Davis Institute, McGill University, Montreal, Canada; Douglas Mental Health University Institute, Montreal, QC, Canada.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

Statins have recently been linked to having effects on cognition and mood in mood disorders, though results are mixed. In this paper, we use data from a recent randomized controlled trial (RCT) to examine the effect of statins on cognition and mood in patients with Bipolar Disorder (BD) and Major Depressive Disorder (MDD).

METHODS:

This is a secondary analysis of a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial (n = 60) originally designed to examine the effect of atorvastatin (n = 27) versus placebo (n = 33) for lithium-induced diabetes insipidus in BD and MDD patients who were using lithium. For this analysis, the primary outcome was global cognition Z-score at 12-weeks adjusted for baseline. The secondary cognition outcomes were (1) Screen for Cognitive Impairment in Psychiatry (SCIP), and (2) executive function Z-score. The primary mood outcome (secondary outcome of this analysis) was depression relapse during 12-week follow-up (Mongomery Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) ≥10). The secondary mood outcomes were (1) relapse rate into a manic episode, and (2) relapse rate into any mood episode.

RESULTS:

After 12 weeks follow-up, atorvastatin and placebo groups did not differ in terms of global cognition Z-score (β = -0.009287 (-0.1698,0.1512), p-value = 0.91). Similarly, composite Z-scores for SCIP and executive functions did not differ significantly. Depression relapse during 12-week follow-up was not significantly different between the groups (χ2 (1) = 0.148, p-value = 0.70). Similarly, there was no difference between groups regarding relapse into mania.

CONCLUSION:

In BD and MDD patients with lithium-induced nephrogenic diabetes insipidus randomized to atorvastatin or placebo, we found no significant differences in cognition and mood outcomes at 12-week follow-up.

KEYWORDS:

Bipolar disorder; Cognition; Major depressive disorder; Placebo; Randomized clinical trial; Statins

PMID:
31733459
DOI:
10.1016/j.jad.2019.11.013

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