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Stem Cell Res. 2019 Oct 24;41:101617. doi: 10.1016/j.scr.2019.101617. [Epub ahead of print]

Immature mDA neurons ameliorate motor deficits in a 6-OHDA Parkinson's disease mouse model and are functional after cryopreservation.

Author information

1
Department of Cell, Developmental, and Regenerative Biology, Mount Sinai Icahn School of Medicine, New York, NY 10029, United States; Black Family Stem Cell Institute, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY 10029, United States; Huffington Foundation Center for Cell-Based Research in Parkinson's Disease, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY 10029, United States.
2
Department of Cell, Developmental, and Regenerative Biology, Mount Sinai Icahn School of Medicine, New York, NY 10029, United States; Black Family Stem Cell Institute, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY 10029, United States; Huffington Foundation Center for Cell-Based Research in Parkinson's Disease, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY 10029, United States. Electronic address: thomas.zwaka@mssm.edu.

Abstract

Parkinson's disease is associated with the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the midbrain. Clinical studies investigating replacement of these neurons with in vitro-generated neurons are currently underway. However, this approach has been limited by difficulties in scaling up on-demand production of midbrain dopaminergic (mDA) neurons from pluripotent stem cells. Cryo-preservation may offer a solution, as it allows for banking of quality controlled mDA neurons. In this study, we tested different freezing conditions and found that optimal cryopreservation of immature human mDA neurons at an early differentiation time point was achieved in STEM-CELLBANKER medium using a controlled freezing program.

KEYWORDS:

6-OHDA mouse model; Cryopreservation; Human induced pluripotent stem cells; Midbrain dopaminergic neurons; Parkinson's disease

PMID:
31731178
DOI:
10.1016/j.scr.2019.101617
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