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Prostaglandins Other Lipid Mediat. 2019 Nov 11;147:106398. doi: 10.1016/j.prostaglandins.2019.106398. [Epub ahead of print]

Lipid mediators of inflammation and Resolution in individuals with tuberculosis and tuberculosis-Diabetes.

Author information

1
Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA; Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, New York, NY, USA. Electronic address: rs3895@cumc.columbia.edu.
2
William Harvey Research Institute, Queens Mary University of London, London, UK.
3
Byramjee-Jeejeebhoy Medical College-Johns Hopkins University Clinical Research Site, Pune, India; Byramjee-Jeejeebhoy Government Medical College, Pune, India.
4
Dr. D.Y. Patil Medical College, Hospital & Research Centre, Dr. D.Y. Patil Vidyapeeth, Pune, India.
5
Byramjee-Jeejeebhoy Medical College-Johns Hopkins University Clinical Research Site, Pune, India.
6
Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA.
7
Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA; Byramjee-Jeejeebhoy Medical College-Johns Hopkins University Clinical Research Site, Pune, India.
8
Instituto Goncalo Moniz, Fundação Oswaldo Cruz, Salvador, Brazil; Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Salvador, Brazil; Multinational Organization Network Sponsoring Translational and Epidemiological Research, Fundação José Silveira, Salvador, Brazil.
9
Instituto Goncalo Moniz, Fundação Oswaldo Cruz, Salvador, Brazil; Multinational Organization Network Sponsoring Translational and Epidemiological Research, Fundação José Silveira, Salvador, Brazil; Curso de Medicina, Faculdade de Tecnologia e Ciências, Salvador, Brazil.
10
Instituto Goncalo Moniz, Fundação Oswaldo Cruz, Salvador, Brazil; Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Salvador, Brazil; Multinational Organization Network Sponsoring Translational and Epidemiological Research, Fundação José Silveira, Salvador, Brazil; Curso de Medicina, Faculdade de Tecnologia e Ciências, Salvador, Brazil; Universidade Salvador (UNIFACS), Laureate Universities, Salvador, Brazil; Escola Bahiana de Medicina e Saúde Pública (EBMSP), Salvador, Brazil.
11
Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA; Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA.

Abstract

Individuals with concurrent tuberculosis (TB) and Type 2 diabetes (DM) have a higher risk of adverse outcomes. To better understand potential immunological differences, we utilized a comprehensive panel to characterize pro-inflammatory and pro-resolving (i.e., mediators involved in the resolution of inflammation) lipid mediators in individuals with TB and TB-DM. A nested cross-sectional study of 40 individuals (20 newly diagnosed DM and 20 without DM) was conducted within a cohort of individuals with active drug-susceptible treatment-naïve pulmonary TB. Lipid mediators were quantified in serum samples through lipid mediator profiling. We conducted correlation-based analysis of these mediators. Overall, the arachidonic acid-derived leukotriene and prostaglandin families were the most abundant pro-inflammatory lipid mediators, while lipoxins and maresins families were the most abundant pro-resolving lipid mediators in individuals with TB and TB-DM. Individuals with TB-DM had increased correlations and connectivity with both pro-inflammatory and pro-resolving lipid mediators compared to those with TB alone. We identified the most abundant lipid mediator metabolomes in circulation among individuals with TB and TB-DM; in addition, our data shows a substantial number of significant correlations between both pro-inflammatory and pro-resolving lipid mediators in individuals with TB-DM, delineating a molecular balance that potentially defines this comorbidity.

KEYWORDS:

Diabetes; Inflammation; Leukotrienes; Lipids; Lipoxins; Prostaglandins; Resolvins; Specialized pro-resolving mediators; Tuberculosis

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