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Hosp Pediatr. 2019 Dec;9(12):983-988. doi: 10.1542/hpeds.2019-0151. Epub 2019 Nov 13.

Factors Influencing Career Longevity in Pediatric Hospital Medicine.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, Children's Hospital at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire; samantha.a.house@hitchcock.org.
2
The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice, Lebanon, New Hampshire; and.
3
Department of Research, American Academy of Pediatrics, Itasca, Illinois.
4
Department of Pediatrics, Children's Hospital at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES:

Pediatric hospital medicine (PHM) is a growing field recently approved by the American Board of Pediatrics as a subspecialty. Understanding factors associated with hospitalist retention is important for workforce planning. Our objective for this study was to examine the proportion of pediatric hospitalists who remained in PHM over a 5-year period and identify factors associated with retention.

METHODS:

We used 2012 and 2016 data from the American Academy of Pediatrics' Pediatrician Life and Career Experience Study. Retention was defined as being a self-reported hospitalist on both surveys. χ2 tests were used to examine relationships between retention and variables within 3 categories: demographics, position-related factors, and factors related to stress and satisfaction. A multivariable logistic regression was used to further assess relationships between select factors and retention.

RESULTS:

In 2012, 206 of 1804 survey respondents were hospitalists (11%); 180 of these 206 individuals responded again in 2016, and 122 (68%) remained hospitalists. In the multivariable analysis, individuals earning ≥$175 000 were more likely than those earning less (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 3.93; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.26-12.25) and those more satisfied with their job were more likely than those less satisfied (aOR = 3.28; 95% CI: 1.22-8.80) to remain hospitalists. Respondents with more concern about educational debt were less likely than those less concerned to remain hospitalists over 5 years (aOR = 0.42; 95% CI: 0.20-0.90).

CONCLUSIONS:

Two-thirds of early- to mid-career hospitalists remained in PHM 5 years later. Financial factors and job satisfaction appear to play an important role in retention; consideration should be given to the impact of these factors on the PHM workforce.

PMID:
31722959
DOI:
10.1542/hpeds.2019-0151

Conflict of interest statement

POTENTIAL CONFLICT OF INTEREST: The authors have indicated they have no potential conflicts of interest to disclose.

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