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J Vet Intern Med. 2020 Jan;34(1):274-282. doi: 10.1111/jvim.15656. Epub 2019 Nov 13.

Lower urinary tract transitional cell carcinoma in cats: Clinical findings, treatments, and outcomes in 118 cases.

Author information

1
School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California-Davis, Davis, California.
2
College of Veterinary Medicine, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado.
3
School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
4
College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee.
5
Carlson College of Veterinary Medicine, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon.
6
College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia.
7
College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina.
8
VCA Canada-Alta Vista Animal Hospital, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
9
College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois.
10
Ontario Veterinary College, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, Canada.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Lower urinary tract transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) is an important but rarely described disease of cats.

OBJECTIVES:

To report the clinical characteristics, treatments, and outcomes in a cohort of cats with lower urinary tract TCC and to test identified variables for prognostic relevance.

ANIMALS:

One-hundred eighteen client-owned cats with lower urinary tract carcinoma.

METHODS:

Medical records were retrospectively reviewed to obtain information regarding clinical characteristics, treatments, and outcomes. Recorded variables were analyzed statistically.

RESULTS:

Median age of affected cats was 15 years (range, 5.0-20.8 years) and median duration of clinical signs was 30 days (range, 0-730 days). The trigone was the most common tumor location (32/118; 27.1%) as assessed by ultrasound examination, cystoscopy, or both. Treatment was carried out in 73 of 118 (61.9%) cats. Metastatic disease was documented in 25 of 118 (21.2%) cats. Median progression-free survival and survival time for all cats were 113 days (95% confidence interval [CI], 69-153) and 155 days (95% CI, 110-222), respectively. Survival increased significantly (P < .001) when comparing cats across the ordered treatment groups: no treatment, treatment without partial cystectomy, and treatment with partial cystectomy. Partial cystectomy (hazard ratio [HR], 0.31; 95% CI, 0.17-0.87) and treatment with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (HR, 0.55; 95% CI, 0.33-0.93) were significantly associated with longer survival times.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL IMPORTANCE:

The results support treatment using partial cystectomy and NSAIDs in cats with TCC.

KEYWORDS:

bladder; cat; cystectomy; neoplasia; urethra

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