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Arch Womens Ment Health. 2019 Nov 13. doi: 10.1007/s00737-019-01008-9. [Epub ahead of print]

Maternal and child delivery charges, postpartum charges, and utilization of care among women with bipolar disorder: a cohort study.

Author information

1
Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology, Division of Maternal Fetal Medicine, University of Colorado School of Medicine/Denver Health & Hospital Authority, Denver, CO, USA. Camille.hoffman-shuler@cuanschutz.edu.
2
Department of Psychiatry, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Academic Office 1, 12631 E 17th Ave, B-108-1, Aurora, CO, USA. Camille.hoffman-shuler@cuanschutz.edu.
3
Center for Health Systems Research, Denver Health & Hospital Authority, Denver, CO, USA.
4
Department of Medicine, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO, USA.
5
Department of Psychiatry, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Academic Office 1, 12631 E 17th Ave, B-108-1, Aurora, CO, USA.
6
Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USA.

Abstract

Bipolar disorder (BD) during pregnancy is known to be a morbid condition associated with poor outcomes for both the mother and her infant. We aimed to determine if women with BD and their children have higher charges and health service utilization than mother-infant dyads with and without other mental health (MH) diagnoses. The International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision (ICD9) codes were used to identify mutually exclusive groups of women who gave birth between January 1, 2011, and December 31, 2012, coding first for BD, then diagnoses that comprised an "other MH diagnoses group" that included post-traumatic stress disorder, anxiety, and depression. Health service utilization and related charges were obtained for the dyad for delivery and for 2 years post-delivery at a single tertiary care center. Analyses included 4440 dyads. A BD diagnosis occurred in 1.8% of medical record codes, other MH diagnoses in 10%, and no known MH diagnosis in 88%. Compared with women with both other MH and no known MH diagnoses, women with BD had higher delivery charges (p < 0.001), higher cumulative charges in the 2 years postpartum (p < 0.001), higher preterm birth and low birthweight rates (15.5% v. 6.9% and 20.8% v. 6.4%, p < 0.001, BD v. no known MH, respectively), and greater utilization of inpatient and emergency psychiatric care services (p < 0.001). Compared with women with and without other mental health diagnoses, women with BD have the highest care utilization and charges. They also have higher preterm birth and low birthweight infant rates, two clinically relevant predictors of long-term health for the child. Given the low prevalence of BD and severity of the disease versus the magnitude of systems costs, women with BD, and their children, deserve the heightened attention afforded to other high-risk perinatal conditions.

KEYWORDS:

Health care charges; Perinatal bipolar disorder; Perinatal mental health

PMID:
31720790
DOI:
10.1007/s00737-019-01008-9

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