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Nat Rev Endocrinol. 2019 Nov 12. doi: 10.1038/s41574-019-0273-8. [Epub ahead of print]

Consensus on the key characteristics of endocrine-disrupting chemicals as a basis for hazard identification.

Author information

1
Department of Environmental Toxicology, University of California, Davis, CA, USA. mlamerrill@ucdavis.edu.
2
Department of Environmental Health Science, School of Public Health and Health Sciences, University of Masschusetts, Amherst, MA, USA.
3
School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, CA, USA.
4
California Pacific Medical Center Research Institute, Sutter Hospital, San Francisco, CA, USA.
5
Environmental Directorate, Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, Paris, France.
6
Department of Biological Sciences, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, USA.
7
International Agency for Research on Cancer, World Health Organization, Lyon, France.
8
Department of Life Sciences, Brunel University, London, UK.
9
Office of the Science Advisor, United States Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC, USA.
10
Program on Reproductive Health and the Environment, Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA.
11
Institute of Data Science, Maastricht University, Maastricht, Netherlands.
12
Center for Health and Environmental Risk Research, National Institute for Environmental Studies, Ibaraki, Japan.
13
Receptor Biology, Section Reproductive and Developmental Biology Laboratory, National Institute of Environmental Health Science, Durham, NC, USA.
14
Division of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX, USA.
15
Office of the Director, Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment of the California Environmental Protection Agency, Sacramento, CA, USA.
16
Biology Department, University of Masschusetts, Amherst, MA, USA.

Abstract

Endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) are exogenous chemicals that interfere with hormone action, thereby increasing the risk of adverse health outcomes, including cancer, reproductive impairment, cognitive deficits and obesity. A complex literature of mechanistic studies provides evidence on the hazards of EDC exposure, yet there is no widely accepted systematic method to integrate these data to help identify EDC hazards. Inspired by work to improve hazard identification of carcinogens using key characteristics (KCs), we have developed ten KCs of EDCs based on our knowledge of hormone actions and EDC effects. In this Expert Consensus Statement, we describe the logic by which these KCs are identified and the assays that could be used to assess several of these KCs. We reflect on how these ten KCs can be used to identify, organize and utilize mechanistic data when evaluating chemicals as EDCs, and we use diethylstilbestrol, bisphenol A and perchlorate as examples to illustrate this approach.

PMID:
31719706
DOI:
10.1038/s41574-019-0273-8

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