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Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2019 Sep;32(3):8-26. doi: 10.12927/cjnl.2019.25975.

Palliative Care Models in Long-Term Care: A Scoping Review.

Author information

1
Professor, School of Nursing, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON.
2
Associate Professor, Faculty of Arts, School of Social Work, McGill University, Montreal, QC.
3
Professor, Faculty of Applied Health Sciences, Brock University, St. Catharines, ON.
4
Associate Professor, College of Nursing, Max Rady Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB.
5
Associate Professor, St. Thomas More College, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK.
6
Assistant Professor, Faculty of Nursing, University of Regina, Regina, SK.
7
Director, Program Administration - Clinical, Toronto Central Local, Health Integration Network, Toronto, ON.
8
Professor, School of Rehabilitation Science, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON.
9
Associate Professor, Chair in Gerontology, Faculty of Nursing, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB.
10
Professor, Department of Medicine, Division of Geriatrics, GERAS Centre, Hamilton Health Sciences, Hamilton, ON.
11
Associate Professor, Department of Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON.
12
Professor of Nursing Aged Care (Dementia), Faculty of Health, University of Technology Sydney Ultimo, NSW.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The goal of this scoping review was to identify existing palliative models in long-term care (LTC) homes and differentiate between the key components of each in terms of training/capacity-building strategies; resident, family and staff support; and advance care planning (ACP) and goals-of-care discussions.

METHODS:

We conducted a scoping review based on established methods to summarize the international literature on palliative models and programs for LTC. We analyzed the data using tabular summaries and content analysis.

RESULTS:

We extracted data from 46 articles related to palliative programs, training/capacity building, family support, ACP and goals of care. Study results highlighted that three key components are needed in a palliative program in LTC: (1) training and capacity building; (2) support for residents, family and staff; and (3) ACP, goals-of-care discussion and informed consent.

CONCLUSION:

This scoping review provided important information about key components to be included in a palliative program in LTC. Future work is needed to develop a model that suits the unique characteristics in the Canadian context.

PMID:
31714204
DOI:
10.12927/cjnl.2019.25975

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